Daily Archives: May 28, 2015

59 - A Confession - Vocabulary

Visit www.anglais.re for more !
 
Here are some things that I used to hate when I first moved to Reunion; but have grown to like or even love:
 
Sparkling water
Champagne
Wasp larva (though definitely not at a love level yet...)
The hard part of bread (I used to only eat the soft inside part)
Papaya
Rice
Coffee 
Fois Gras
Letchis
 
But there is one thing that I can never grow to love. In fact; I think I hate it more and more every day.
 
I'm very sorry to confess, I HATE to do "the bise;"
 
At first it was kind of funny. I would meet new people and I would instinctively extend my hand to shake theirs, as we do in America. Awkwardly (and hilariously) at the same time, my new acquaintance would lean in to do "the bise" and I would end up kind of gently punching them in the stomach. This was about FOUR YEARS AGO and doing the bise has never gotten any easier for me.
 
First of all, it is not my first instinct to lean in for the bise when I meet someone or see them for the first time that day. At least once every day, I "leave someone hanging," meaning I say hi and wave while they are extending their cheek expectantly in my direction. This causes me to snap awake, apologize, and mumble in my head about how I will never get used to doing this.
 
The worst might be at parties. I really really hate arriving at a big party, because you're supposed to go around to EVERY SINGLE PERSON at the party, inturrupt them, wait for them to stop what they are doing and turn around, and kiss them. This is annoying because it takes like 30 minutes to enter a party, and it's really just awkward inturrupting people who are in the middle of talking or eating to touch my cheek to their cheek. I'm actually laughing as a type this. Who ever thought that tapping cheeks together was a good way to say hello? Ok anyway, the other reason I hate entering parties is because I normally know only like 5 people at the party, which means all the rest of them are complete strangers that I will most likely never see again. Some of them are sweaty. Some of them are sick. Some of them are a little TOO friendly. I DON'T WANT TO TOUCH YOUR FACE WITH MY FACE! Oh and it's usually at parties where I encounter a lot of people who don't do the kissy noise when cheek tapping. I find this even more weird than doing the normal bise. If you don't make the kissy noise; it's just...uncomfortably silent and kind of creepy
 
Avoiding the bise has become a subconscious hobby for me. In the mornings I find myself walking the long way around school halls to avoid groups of adults, or keeping the farthest away possible when greeting someone. "Good morning!" I'll yell down the hall to the teacher, hoping that it counts as our initial contact for the day. I can see it in people's eyes when they unexpectedly run into me in the break room and want to go in for some bise time. But I just wave and run away. I think it's very possible that I am the "Weird American Girl" in all my schools.
 
I don't feel like that ALL the time, of course! I like to give the bise to my friends every so often, especially if I haven't seen them in a few days and I'm genuinely happy to see them again! In situtations like that, the bise is just a natural extension of my love and friendship. Granted, in the US I would hug you instead, but that's not too far of a step away from doing the bise!
 
In general I try really hard to not offend anyone, and to take part of the culture in which I have chosen to live. And I am doing so well drinking my champgane now and eating some wasp larva...but the bise is something I will never ever like. And here is the cherry on top as to why:
 
There are a few guys that seem to be without a home and hang around the streets of St Gilles where I live. I always make it a point to say hi to them, smile, and make eye contact, so that they at least don't feel invisible. One of them once shook my hand and told me his name is Patrick. Patrick and I say hi whenever we see each other in the street. One day, while on the way to a private lesson not far from my house, I ran into Patrick. We talked for a second, and then he said "well, we should do the bise!" and I hesitated (for long enough a time that anyone else would've considered it very rude) before saying ok. Then when I leaned in for some cheek on cheek action I got quite a surprise...Patrick left a big wet sloppy KISS on both of my cheeks. As soon as I got to my client's house I washed all that spit off my face and vowed that I will NEVER LIKE DOING THE BISE!! 
 
During our lesson, I asked my student why; WHY do some people do that during the bise? Why do they literally kiss your cheeks?? What does this mean?! And he explained that there is a lot of unsaid communication that goes along with doing the bise. A whole world of saying stuff without saying stuff that I never knew existed. With a simple cheek to cheek touch, you can snub someone, flirt with someone, offend someone, profess your undying love, or a million different things in between.
 
I find normal French difficult enough, I have no interest in learning secret cheek language.
 
And that is why I will forever hate doing the bise.
 
Vocabulary:
 
to grow to like - apprenez à aimer
shake hands - serrer la main
awkwardly - maladroitement
to lean in - penchez
to punch - cogner
 
to wave - saluer
to apologize - s'excuser
to mumble - marmonner
creepy - qui donne la chair de poule
to hug - embrasser
 
cheek - joue
 
00:0000:00

59 - A Confession - Slow

Visit www.anglais.re for more !
 
Here are some things that I used to hate when I first moved to Reunion; but have grown to like or even love:
 
Sparkling water
Champagne
Wasp larva (though definitely not at a love level yet...)
The hard part of bread (I used to only eat the soft inside part)
Papaya
Rice
Coffee 
Fois Gras
Letchis
 
But there is one thing that I can never grow to love. In fact; I think I hate it more and more every day.
 
I'm very sorry to confess, I HATE to do "the bise;"
 
At first it was kind of funny. I would meet new people and I would instinctively extend my hand to shake theirs, as we do in America. Awkwardly (and hilariously) at the same time, my new acquaintance would lean in to do "the bise" and I would end up kind of gently punching them in the stomach. This was about FOUR YEARS AGO and doing the bise has never gotten any easier for me.
 
First of all, it is not my first instinct to lean in for the bise when I meet someone or see them for the first time that day. At least once every day, I "leave someone hanging," meaning I say hi and wave while they are extending their cheek expectantly in my direction. This causes me to snap awake, apologize, and mumble in my head about how I will never get used to doing this.
 
The worst might be at parties. I really really hate arriving at a big party, because you're supposed to go around to EVERY SINGLE PERSON at the party, inturrupt them, wait for them to stop what they are doing and turn around, and kiss them. This is annoying because it takes like 30 minutes to enter a party, and it's really just awkward inturrupting people who are in the middle of talking or eating to touch my cheek to their cheek. I'm actually laughing as a type this. Who ever thought that tapping cheeks together was a good way to say hello? Ok anyway, the other reason I hate entering parties is because I normally know only like 5 people at the party, which means all the rest of them are complete strangers that I will most likely never see again. Some of them are sweaty. Some of them are sick. Some of them are a little TOO friendly. I DON'T WANT TO TOUCH YOUR FACE WITH MY FACE! Oh and it's usually at parties where I encounter a lot of people who don't do the kissy noise when cheek tapping. I find this even more weird than doing the normal bise. If you don't make the kissy noise; it's just...uncomfortably silent and kind of creepy
 
Avoiding the bise has become a subconscious hobby for me. In the mornings I find myself walking the long way around school halls to avoid groups of adults, or keeping the farthest away possible when greeting someone. "Good morning!" I'll yell down the hall to the teacher, hoping that it counts as our initial contact for the day. I can see it in people's eyes when they unexpectedly run into me in the break room and want to go in for some bise time. But I just wave and run away. I think it's very possible that I am the "Weird American Girl" in all my schools.
 
I don't feel like that ALL the time, of course! I like to give the bise to my friends every so often, especially if I haven't seen them in a few days and I'm genuinely happy to see them again! In situtations like that, the bise is just a natural extension of my love and friendship. Granted, in the US I would hug you instead, but that's not too far of a step away from doing the bise!
 
In general I try really hard to not offend anyone, and to take part of the culture in which I have chosen to live. And I am doing so well drinking my champgane now and eating some wasp larva...but the bise is something I will never ever like. And here is the cherry on top as to why:
 
There are a few guys that seem to be without a home and hang around the streets of St Gilles where I live. I always make it a point to say hi to them, smile, and make eye contact, so that they at least don't feel invisible. One of them once shook my hand and told me his name is Patrick. Patrick and I say hi whenever we see each other in the street. One day, while on the way to a private lesson not far from my house, I ran into Patrick. We talked for a second, and then he said "well, we should do the bise!" and I hesitated (for long enough a time that anyone else would've considered it very rude) before saying ok. Then when I leaned in for some cheek on cheek action I got quite a surprise...Patrick left a big wet sloppy KISS on both of my cheeks. As soon as I got to my client's house I washed all that spit off my face and vowed that I will NEVER LIKE DOING THE BISE!! 
 
During our lesson, I asked my student why; WHY do some people do that during the bise? Why do they literally kiss your cheeks?? What does this mean?! And he explained that there is a lot of unsaid communication that goes along with doing the bise. A whole world of saying stuff without saying stuff that I never knew existed. With a simple cheek to cheek touch, you can snub someone, flirt with someone, offend someone, profess your undying love, or a million different things in between.
 
I find normal French difficult enough, I have no interest in learning secret cheek language.
 
And that is why I will forever hate doing the bise.
 
Vocabulary:
 
to grow to like - apprenez à aimer
shake hands - serrer la main
awkwardly - maladroitement
to lean in - penchez
to punch - cogner
 
to wave - saluer
to apologize - s'excuser
to mumble - marmonner
creepy - qui donne la chair de poule
to hug - embrasser
 
cheek - joue
 
00:0000:00

59 - A Confession

Visit www.anglais.re for more !
Here are some things that I used to hate when I first moved to Reunion; but have grown to like or even love:
Sparkling water
Champagne
Wasp larva (though definitely not at a love level yet...)
The hard part of bread (I used to only eat the soft inside part)
Papaya
Rice
Coffee 
Fois Gras
Letchis
But there is one thing that I can never grow to love. In fact; I think I hate it more and more every day.
I'm very sorry to confess, I HATE to do "the bise;"
At first it was kind of funny. I would meet new people and I would instinctively extend my hand to shake theirs, as we do in America. Awkwardly (and hilariously) at the same time, my new acquaintance would lean in to do "the bise" and I would end up kind of gently punching them in the stomach. This was about FOUR YEARS AGO and doing the bise has never gotten any easier for me.
First of all, it is not my first instinct to lean in for the bise when I meet someone or see them for the first time that day. At least once every day, I "leave someone hanging," meaning I say hi and wave while they are extending their cheek expectantly in my direction. This causes me to snap awake, apologize, and mumble in my head about how I will never get used to doing this.
The worst might be at parties. I really really hate arriving at a big party, because you're supposed to go around to EVERY SINGLE PERSON at the party, inturrupt them, wait for them to stop what they are doing and turn around, and kiss them. This is annoying because it takes like 30 minutes to enter a party, and it's really just awkward inturrupting people who are in the middle of talking or eating to touch my cheek to their cheek. I'm actually laughing as a type this. Who ever thought that tapping cheeks together was a good way to say hello? Ok anyway, the other reason I hate entering parties is because I normally know only like 5 people at the party, which means all the rest of them are complete strangers that I will most likely never see again. Some of them are sweaty. Some of them are sick. Some of them are a little TOO friendly. I DON'T WANT TO TOUCH YOUR FACE WITH MY FACE! Oh and it's usually at parties where I encounter a lot of people who don't do the kissy noise when cheek tapping. I find this even more weird than doing the normal bise. If you don't make the kissy noise; it's just...uncomfortably silent and kind of creepy
Avoiding the bise has become a subconscious hobby for me. In the mornings I find myself walking the long way around school halls to avoid groups of adults, or keeping the farthest away possible when greeting someone. "Good morning!" I'll yell down the hall to the teacher, hoping that it counts as our initial contact for the day. I can see it in people's eyes when they unexpectedly run into me in the break room and want to go in for some bise time. But I just wave and run away. I think it's very possible that I am the "Weird American Girl" in all my schools.
I don't feel like that ALL the time, of course! I like to give the bise to my friends every so often, especially if I haven't seen them in a few days and I'm genuinely happy to see them again! In situtations like that, the bise is just a natural extension of my love and friendship. Granted, in the US I would hug you instead, but that's not too far of a step away from doing the bise!
In general I try really hard to not offend anyone, and to take part of the culture in which I have chosen to live. And I am doing so well drinking my champgane now and eating some wasp larva...but the bise is something I will never ever like. And here is the cherry on top as to why:
There are a few guys that seem to be without a home and hang around the streets of St Gilles where I live. I always make it a point to say hi to them, smile, and make eye contact, so that they at least don't feel invisible. One of them once shook my hand and told me his name is Patrick. Patrick and I say hi whenever we see each other in the street. One day, while on the way to a private lesson not far from my house, I ran into Patrick. We talked for a second, and then he said "well, we should do the bise!" and I hesitated (for long enough a time that anyone else would've considered it very rude) before saying ok. Then when I leaned in for some cheek on cheek action I got quite a surprise...Patrick left a big wet sloppy KISS on both of my cheeks. As soon as I got to my client's house I washed all that spit off my face and vowed that I will NEVER LIKE DOING THE BISE!! 
During our lesson, I asked my student why; WHY do some people do that during the bise? Why do they literally kiss your cheeks?? What does this mean?! And he explained that there is a lot of unsaid communication that goes along with doing the bise. A whole world of saying stuff without saying stuff that I never knew existed. With a simple cheek to cheek touch, you can snub someone, flirt with someone, offend someone, profess your undying love, or a million different things in between.
I find normal French difficult enough, I have no interest in learning secret cheek language.
And that is why I will forever hate doing the bise.
Vocabulary:
to grow to like - apprenez à aimer
shake hands - serrer la main
awkwardly - maladroitement
to lean in - penchez
to punch - cogner
to wave - saluer
to apologize - s'excuser
to mumble - marmonner
creepy - qui donne la chair de poule
to hug - embrasser
cheek - joue
00:0000:00

58 - Brits Abroad - Vocabulary

Visit www.anglais.re for more !

 
Finally after two years of living in Reunion my parents decided to make the 'terribly long' journey. Although they didn't choose the easiest route, deciding to fly via Dubai and Mauritius, they finally made it to paradise. The first thing my father noticed was the heat! Like me, my mother loves the heat, but my father isn't the biggest fan but luckily I have air con at my place!

So after a 24 hour journey we got stuck straight into the beach and lunch. It was their first taste of island life, drinking a Dodo, eating samosas and"chillaxing" on the beach, which, as my mother adored, is just a stone's throw away from my apartment. The first evening we headed to my favourtie restaurant in St Pierre to taste some local cuisine. I, of course, opted for a rougail saucisse whereas they both chose swordfish. My father had a shock when he tasted what he thought was a lovely little tomato salad...yes he ate a big spoonful of rougail tomate! His face was hilarious. (I'm not mean honestly.)

We made sure to venture around Réunion, well the beaches at least. As my parents were only visiting reunion for a total of 6 days, time was a limited resource and it was of course their holiday. We did, however, spend Sunday the traditional Creole way, with my friends and their family over a BBQ just below Piton Bois de Nefles, Etang Salé. I am addicted to BBQs now, every opportunity I have, I take to have a BBQ. The weather is a major factor because in the UK I hated BBQs, but here with the sun constantly shining, there is nothing better than to hang out with friends over some grilled meat!

It was here in Etang Salé that I saw my first shark in Reunion. The shark was somehow attached to buoy in the sea. Safe to say we didn't go swimming after that! Again it was these little experiences which made my parents holiday that extra special. Although the fact that they don't speak any French at all, made my experience a little more stressful, translating menus several times then repeating again isn't all that fun!

On the day before our departure to Mauritius, I decided to organise a tour of the island in a light aircraft for my mother. What better way to see Reunion than from above, plus the perfect gift for Mother's Day, which just so happened to be the same day! I did offer it to my father too, but as soon as I mentioned the idea, his face drained with colour. He suffers from vertigo, so the idea of flying in a light aircraft terrified him. So off my mother flew, and after 60 minutes she returned with a huge grin on her face. She loved it! At least this way she had the chance to see the volcano, Cilaos,the Piton des Neiges and Mafate. It was the perfect way to end the lovely, but short, stay on the island.

We then flew to Mauritius to spend a week on the beach and nothing more.

Vocabulary
 
journey - voyage 
route - parcours
to notice - remarquer
air con - la clim
"chillaxing" - se détendre
 
a stone's throw away - à un jet de pierre
whereas - tandis que
swordfish - espadon
spoonful - cuillerée
mean - méchant
 
hang out - trainer dehors
several times - plusieurs fois
Mother's Day - Fête des Mères
grin - sourire
00:0000:00

58 - Brits Abroad - Slow

Visit www.anglais.re for more !

 
Finally after two years of living in Reunion my parents decided to make the 'terribly long' journey. Although they didn't choose the easiest route, deciding to fly via Dubai and Mauritius, they finally made it to paradise. The first thing my father noticed was the heat! Like me, my mother loves the heat, but my father isn't the biggest fan but luckily I have air con at my place!

So after a 24 hour journey we got stuck straight into the beach and lunch. It was their first taste of island life, drinking a Dodo, eating samosas and"chillaxing" on the beach, which, as my mother adored, is just a stone's throw away from my apartment. The first evening we headed to my favourtie restaurant in St Pierre to taste some local cuisine. I, of course, opted for a rougail saucisse whereas they both chose swordfish. My father had a shock when he tasted what he thought was a lovely little tomato salad...yes he ate a big spoonful of rougail tomate! His face was hilarious. (I'm not mean honestly.)

We made sure to venture around Réunion, well the beaches at least. As my parents were only visiting reunion for a total of 6 days, time was a limited resource and it was of course their holiday. We did, however, spend Sunday the traditional Creole way, with my friends and their family over a BBQ just below Piton Bois de Nefles, Etang Salé. I am addicted to BBQs now, every opportunity I have, I take to have a BBQ. The weather is a major factor because in the UK I hated BBQs, but here with the sun constantly shining, there is nothing better than to hang out with friends over some grilled meat!

It was here in Etang Salé that I saw my first shark in Reunion. The shark was somehow attached to buoy in the sea. Safe to say we didn't go swimming after that! Again it was these little experiences which made my parents holiday that extra special. Although the fact that they don't speak any French at all, made my experience a little more stressful, translating menus several times then repeating again isn't all that fun!

On the day before our departure to Mauritius, I decided to organise a tour of the island in a light aircraft for my mother. What better way to see Reunion than from above, plus the perfect gift for Mother's Day, which just so happened to be the same day! I did offer it to my father too, but as soon as I mentioned the idea, his face drained with colour. He suffers from vertigo, so the idea of flying in a light aircraft terrified him. So off my mother flew, and after 60 minutes she returned with a huge grin on her face. She loved it! At least this way she had the chance to see the volcano, Cilaos,the Piton des Neiges and Mafate. It was the perfect way to end the lovely, but short, stay on the island.

We then flew to Mauritius to spend a week on the beach and nothing more.

Vocabulary
 
journey - voyage 
route - parcours
to notice - remarquer
air con - la clim
"chillaxing" - se détendre
 
a stone's throw away - à un jet de pierre
whereas - tandis que
swordfish - espadon
spoonful - cuillerée
mean - méchant
 
hang out - trainer dehors
several times - plusieurs fois
Mother's Day - Fête des Mères
grin - sourire
00:0000:00

58 - Brits Abroad

Visit www.anglais.re for more !


Finally after two years of living in Reunion my parents decided to make the 'terribly long' journey. Although they didn't choose the easiest route, deciding to fly via Dubai and Mauritius, they finally made it to paradise. The first thing my father noticed was the heat! Like me, my mother loves the heat, but my father isn't the biggest fan but luckily I have air con at my place!

So after a 24 hour journey we got stuck straight into the beach and lunch. It was their first taste of island life, drinking a Dodo, eating samosas and"chillaxing" on the beach, which, as my mother adored, is just a stone's throw away from my apartment. The first evening we headed to my favourtie restaurant in St Pierre to taste some local cuisine. I, of course, opted for a rougail saucisse whereas they both chose swordfish. My father had a shock when he tasted what he thought was a lovely little tomato salad...yes he ate a big spoonful of rougail tomate! His face was hilarious. (I'm not mean honestly.)

We made sure to venture around Réunion, well the beaches at least. As my parents were only visiting reunion for a total of 6 days, time was a limited resource and it was of course their holiday. We did, however, spend Sunday the traditional Creole way, with my friends and their family over a BBQ just below Piton Bois de Nefles, Etang Salé. I am addicted to BBQs now, every opportunity I have, I take to have a BBQ. The weather is a major factor because in the UK I hated BBQs, but here with the sun constantly shining, there is nothing better than to hang out with friends over some grilled meat!

It was here in Etang Salé that I saw my first shark in Reunion. The shark was somehow attached to buoy in the sea. Safe to say we didn't go swimming after that! Again it was these little experiences which made my parents holiday that extra special. Although the fact that they don't speak any French at all, made my experience a little more stressful, translating menus several times then repeating again isn't all that fun!

On the day before our departure to Mauritius, I decided to organise a tour of the island in a light aircraft for my mother. What better way to see Reunion than from above, plus the perfect gift for Mother's Day, which just so happened to be the same day! I did offer it to my father too, but as soon as I mentioned the idea, his face drained with colour. He suffers from vertigo, so the idea of flying in a light aircraft terrified him. So off my mother flew, and after 60 minutes she returned with a huge grin on her face. She loved it! At least this way she had the chance to see the volcano, Cilaos,the Piton des Neiges and Mafate. It was the perfect way to end the lovely, but short, stay on the island.

We then flew to Mauritius to spend a week on the beach and nothing more.

Vocabulary

journey - voyage 
route - parcours
to notice - remarquer
air con - la clim
"chillaxing" - se détendre

a stone's throw away - à un jet de pierre
whereas - tandis que
swordfish - espadon
spoonful - cuillerée
mean - méchant

hang out - trainer dehors
several times - plusieurs fois
Mother's Day - Fête des Mères
grin - sourire

00:0000:00

57 - My Market - Vocabulary

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

 
When I first came to Reunion in 2007, I was surprised to find an island full of modern cars, new roads, the latest technology and fashion. But one thing that was outdated was the local food scene. I was on a fertile, beautiful island with plenty of sun and rain...so why were the supermarkets full of South African apples, Dutch mushrooms and onions from Madagascar? Not to mention the meat, dairy products, oil, rice, spices and packaged foods all shipped in from outside the island. 

At the time, I was used to buying free-range eggs and some organic fruits and vegetables at my local markets back home. But in Reunion I could only find industrial cage eggs. At the markets, there was a lot of local produce but it was all heavily treated. That was 8 years ago, and today it's easier to buy organic and specialty products here. But myself and many other people I know are put off by the high cost, as well as the fact that the majority is imported.

That's why my husband and I decided to start a project recently, to enable more people to buy high quality, organic and artisinal products straight from the producer for a reasonable price. The idea isn't very original. In many other places, including mainland France you can find organic farmers' markets and Community Supported Agriculture programs, known as AMAP in French. We called our project Le Karo, and it's open every Saturday afternoon on our farm in La Possession. So far, we have fruits, vegetables, eggs, spices, honey, spirulina, kombucha, bread, fish and several other products. 
We hope our little contribution will help make organic food more accessible and affordable for a large percentage of the Reunion Island population. In the meantime, I'm happy to finally be able to cook a delicious meal made from products grown on my adopted island home. After all, if I wanted to keep eating Australian carrots, I would have stayed in Australia!
 
Vocabulary:
 
outdated - dépassé
plenty - assez
Dutch - néerlandais
shipped in - importé
free-range egg - oeuf fermier
 
back home - à la maison (australie)
put off - dissuader
so far - jusqu'ici
affordable - abordable
keep - continuer
00:0000:00

57 - My Market - Slow

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

 
When I first came to Reunion in 2007, I was surprised to find an island full of modern cars, new roads, the latest technology and fashion. But one thing that was outdated was the local food scene. I was on a fertile, beautiful island with plenty of sun and rain...so why were the supermarkets full of South African apples, Dutch mushrooms and onions from Madagascar? Not to mention the meat, dairy products, oil, rice, spices and packaged foods all shipped in from outside the island. 

At the time, I was used to buying free-range eggs and some organic fruits and vegetables at my local markets back home. But in Reunion I could only find industrial cage eggs. At the markets, there was a lot of local produce but it was all heavily treated. That was 8 years ago, and today it's easier to buy organic and specialty products here. But myself and many other people I know are put off by the high cost, as well as the fact that the majority is imported.

That's why my husband and I decided to start a project recently, to enable more people to buy high quality, organic and artisinal products straight from the producer for a reasonable price. The idea isn't very original. In many other places, including mainland France you can find organic farmers' markets and Community Supported Agriculture programs, known as AMAP in French. We called our project Le Karo, and it's open every Saturday afternoon on our farm in La Possession. So far, we have fruits, vegetables, eggs, spices, honey, spirulina, kombucha, bread, fish and several other products. 
We hope our little contribution will help make organic food more accessible and affordable for a large percentage of the Reunion Island population. In the meantime, I'm happy to finally be able to cook a delicious meal made from products grown on my adopted island home. After all, if I wanted to keep eating Australian carrots, I would have stayed in Australia!
 
Vocabulary:
 
outdated - dépassé
plenty - assez
Dutch - néerlandais
shipped in - importé
free-range egg - oeuf fermier
 
back home - à la maison (australie)
put off - dissuader
so far - jusqu'ici
affordable - abordable
keep - continuer
00:0000:00

57 - My Market

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When I first came to Reunion in 2007, I was surprised to find an island full of modern cars, new roads, the latest technology and fashion. But one thing that was outdated was the local food scene. I was on a fertile, beautiful island with plenty of sun and rain...so why were the supermarkets full of South African apples, Dutch mushrooms and onions from Madagascar? Not to mention the meat, dairy products, oil, rice, spices and packaged foods all shipped in from outside the island. 

At the time, I was used to buying free-range eggs and some organic fruits and vegetables at my local markets back home. But in Reunion I could only find industrial cage eggs. At the markets, there was a lot of local produce but it was all heavily treated. That was 8 years ago, and today it's easier to buy organic and specialty products here. But myself and many other people I know are put off by the high cost, as well as the fact that the majority is imported.

That's why my husband and I decided to start a project recently, to enable more people to buy high quality, organic and artisinal products straight from the producer for a reasonable price. The idea isn't very original. In many other places, including mainland France you can find organic farmers' markets and Community Supported Agriculture programs, known as AMAP in French. We called our project Le Karo, and it's open every Saturday afternoon on our farm in La Possession. So far, we have fruits, vegetables, eggs, spices, honey, spirulina, kombucha, bread, fish and several other products. 
We hope our little contribution will help make organic food more accessible and affordable for a large percentage of the Reunion Island population. In the meantime, I'm happy to finally be able to cook a delicious meal made from products grown on my adopted island home. After all, if I wanted to keep eating Australian carrots, I would have stayed in Australia!
Vocabulary:
outdated - dépassé
plenty - assez
Dutch - néerlandais
shipped in - importé
free-range egg - oeuf fermier
back home - à la maison (australie)
put off - dissuader
so far - jusqu'ici
affordable - abordable
keep - continuer
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56 - Goyavier Fever - Vocabulary

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In Réunion it seems each month brings with it a new tropical fruit to discover. Now that it's May, goyavier is the fruit of the month. I had never tried or even had heard of this delicious red fruit before I came to Reunion. I knew of guava but not goyavier. In previous months here I had goyavier juice but only recently did I get to try the fresh fruit and oh my god I'm in love. I think I could live on lychees and goyavier,

So a week ago, my landlord organized a goodbye Creole picnic for us. We drove to the Foret de Bebour since I had never been there. We brought baskets full of picnic supplies that filled up the trunk of our tiny French car like true Creoles- blankets, folding chairs, marmites full of rice and caris, rougails, quiches, salad, and lots of rhum arrange, wine, and beer, and buckets for goyavier. Instead of taking the Plaines, we took a bunch of windy side roads to discover even more of Reunion. When we arrived in the forest, our first stop was to pick goyavier. We paid 10€ for a giant bucket to pick as many goyaviers as we could. Dennis and I left the group to go search for an untouched area with big, juicy, ripe red and purple fruits. One goyavier in the bucket, one in my mouth. And so it went like this for over an hour until both my belly and the bucket were full. Then we transferred the goyaviers into our own buckets and found a nice place in the forest to sit and have our elaborate Creole picnic.

When we got home, I started looking up recipes to deal with the almost 10 kilos of goyavier! For the next four days I was busy mixing goyaviers and straining the seeds to make all sorts of delicious things before the fruits rotted. Fresh goyavier do not last long, only a few days at the most. It's so nice though to have so much fresh produce here. In the US fruits last much longer because they are full of nasty preservatives and pesticides. I succeeded to use all the goyavier and made a bunch of goyavier mousses, sorbets, and rum of course. The kitchen was a mess as there was goyavier juice everywhere! Our other friends from the picnic made a bunch of sauces with the goyavier and we all shared our recipes and dishes. Surprisingly I'm not sick of goyavier yet. I know I must savour them as much as possible since soon the season will be over and it will be another fruit's time to shine.

Vocabulary

landlord - propriétaire

baskets - paniers

trunk - coffre

windy - sinueuse

to pick - cueillir

bucket - seau

looking up - chercher

to strain - prendre du jus

to rot - pourrir

a bunch of - bcp de

dishes - les plats

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