Daily Archives: December 24, 2015

80 - Boxing Day - Vocabulary

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

 

In the immortal words of Noddy Holder, it's Christmas! Or is it?

 

This episode comes out on Thursday the 24th of December, which for the people of Reunion is Christmas. For us Brits, however, it's nothing special. No, we celebrate Christmas on the 25th, which is great if you are a parent. You see, we get to send our kids to bed early on the 24th. We don't have to wait up until midnight, while the kids run around. In fact, in Britain the children want to go to bed earlier. The earlier they sleep, the earlier they can wake up the next morning to open their presents.

 

This is something I will never understand about Christmas in Reunion. You give gifts to your youngsters at midnight, so they are all excited about their new toys and games, and to punish them you only let them play for an hour or so before sending them to bed!

 

No, we have to wait until the 25th to exchange our gifts. Don't feel too sad for us however, because we have something you don't. Boxing Day!

 

"What on Earth is Boxing Day?" you all cry! No, it's not the day that your uncles drink too much Red Label, and get into boxing matches with each other (that's new years eve, surely). Despite its name, it has nothing to do with the sport of boxing.

 

Legend goes that back in the 17th century, on the first day back to work after the Christmas festivities, employers would hand their employees Christmas 'boxes'. Small packages containing their Christmas present. These boxes may have contained their Christmas bonus, presents for their families, or even leftovers from the employers Christmas feast. This tradition has died out, but the bank holiday remains. Nowadays, Boxing Day is celebrated by nursing a hangover, and digesting all that turkey from the day before.

 

So, I'm going to have a very British Christmas this year. On the 24th I intend to leave out a glass of whisky for Father Christmas, and a carrot for Rudolph. In the evening I will hide small presents in my children's stockings, then hang them on the tree.

 

A modest breakfast on the 25th while the children open their presents. Turkey, cranberry, parsnips and stuffing for lunch, and an evening in.

Boxing day will be celebrated just like in Britain. With a couple of paracetamols, and a lot of coffee.

 

Merry Christmas to you all, and a Happy New Year.

 

Vocabulary

 

to come out - sortir

to celebrate - fêter

a youngster - un enfant

however - cependant

despite - malgré

 

festivities - les fêtes

leftovers - les restes (de nourriture)

a feast - un banquet

a bank holiday - une jour férié

nowadays - de nos jours

 

to nurse - soigner

a hangover - une gueule de bois

turkey - de la dinde

stockings - les bas

a parsnip - un navet

 

stuffing - la farce

00:0000:00

80 - Boxing Day - Slow

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

 

In the immortal words of Noddy Holder, it's Christmas! Or is it?

 

This episode comes out on Thursday the 24th of December, which for the people of Reunion is Christmas. For us Brits, however, it's nothing special. No, we celebrate Christmas on the 25th, which is great if you are a parent. You see, we get to send our kids to bed early on the 24th. We don't have to wait up until midnight, while the kids run around. In fact, in Britain the children want to go to bed earlier. The earlier they sleep, the earlier they can wake up the next morning to open their presents.

 

This is something I will never understand about Christmas in Reunion. You give gifts to your youngsters at midnight, so they are all excited about their new toys and games, and to punish them you only let them play for an hour or so before sending them to bed!

 

No, we have to wait until the 25th to exchange our gifts. Don't feel too sad for us however, because we have something you don't. Boxing Day!

 

"What on Earth is Boxing Day?" you all cry! No, it's not the day that your uncles drink too much Red Label, and get into boxing matches with each other (that's new years eve, surely). Despite its name, it has nothing to do with the sport of boxing.

 

Legend goes that back in the 17th century, on the first day back to work after the Christmas festivities, employers would hand their employees Christmas 'boxes'. Small packages containing their Christmas present. These boxes may have contained their Christmas bonus, presents for their families, or even leftovers from the employers Christmas feast. This tradition has died out, but the bank holiday remains. Nowadays, Boxing Day is celebrated by nursing a hangover, and digesting all that turkey from the day before.

 

So, I'm going to have a very British Christmas this year. On the 24th I intend to leave out a glass of whisky for Father Christmas, and a carrot for Rudolph. In the evening I will hide small presents in my children's stockings, then hang them on the tree.

 

A modest breakfast on the 25th while the children open their presents. Turkey, cranberry, parsnips and stuffing for lunch, and an evening in.

Boxing day will be celebrated just like in Britain. With a couple of paracetamols, and a lot of coffee.

 

Merry Christmas to you all, and a Happy New Year.

 

Vocabulary

 

to come out - sortir

to celebrate - fêter

a youngster - un enfant

however - cependant

despite - malgré

 

festivities - les fêtes

leftovers - les restes (de nourriture)

a feast - un banquet

a bank holiday - une jour férié

nowadays - de nos jours

 

to nurse - soigner

a hangover - une gueule de bois

turkey - de la dinde

stockings - les bas

a parsnip - un navet

 

stuffing - la farce

00:0000:00

80 - Boxing Day

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

In the immortal words of Noddy Holder, it's Christmas! Or is it?

This episode comes out on Thursday the 24th of December, which for the people of Reunion is Christmas. For us Brits, however, it's nothing special. No, we celebrate Christmas on the 25th, which is great if you are a parent. You see, we get to send our kids to bed early on the 24th. We don't have to wait up until midnight, while the kids run around. In fact, in Britain the children want to go to bed earlier. The earlier they sleep, the earlier they can wake up the next morning to open their presents.

This is something I will never understand about Christmas in Reunion. You give gifts to your youngsters at midnight, so they are all excited about their new toys and games, and to punish them you only let them play for an hour or so before sending them to bed!

No, we have to wait until the 25th to exchange our gifts. Don't feel too sad for us however, because we have something you don't. Boxing Day!

"What on Earth is Boxing Day?" you all cry! No, it's not the day that your uncles drink too much Red Label, and get into boxing matches with each other (that's new years eve, surely). Despite its name, it has nothing to do with the sport of boxing.

Legend goes that back in the 17th century, on the first day back to work after the Christmas festivities, employers would hand their employees Christmas 'boxes'. Small packages containing their Christmas present. These boxes may have contained their Christmas bonus, presents for their families, or even leftovers from the employers Christmas feast. This tradition has died out, but the bank holiday remains. Nowadays, Boxing Day is celebrated by nursing a hangover, and digesting all that turkey from the day before.

So, I'm going to have a very British Christmas this year. On the 24th I intend to leave out a glass of whisky for Father Christmas, and a carrot for Rudolph. In the evening I will hide small presents in my children's stockings, then hang them on the tree.

A modest breakfast on the 25th while the children open their presents. Turkey, cranberry, parsnips and stuffing for lunch, and an evening in.

Boxing day will be celebrated just like in Britain. With a couple of paracetamols, and a lot of coffee.

Merry Christmas to you all, and a Happy New Year.

Vocabulary

to come out - sortir

to celebrate - fêter

a youngster - un enfant

however - cependant

despite - malgré

festivities - les fêtes

leftovers - les restes (de nourriture)

a feast - un banquet

a bank holiday - une jour férié

nowadays - de nos jours

to nurse - soigner

a hangover - une gueule de bois

turkey - de la dinde

stockings - les bas

a parsnip - un navet

stuffing - la farce

00:0000:00

79 - Ilet Alcide

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

Hello! Welcome to another podcast from Anglais.re.

Here I am up in the west of Reunion Island, in an area that’s called Le Maido. Le Maido is a viewpoint looking out over the cirque of Mafate at around 2600m altitude. It’s a phenomenal viewpoint. To be more precise, I am exactly on a footpath which runs down from Maido to a village called Sans Souci. As you can see from the signpost here: ‘Ilet Alcide’ ‘Sans Souci’. Sans Souci is that way, about an hour and a half’s jog, or a couple of hours’ slow walk if you’re Richard!

Going up to the right is a place called Ilet Alcide. This is a place where about 60 years ago there was a guy who lived there, all on his own in the middle of nowhere, perched on the edge of this cliff-face. There was a river running through the area where he lived and he had a makeshift hut in which he slept. His name was Gerard Alcide Clain, and he lived there for quite some time - about fifteen years if memory serves me correctly.

In any case, this viewpoint, in fact this walk has a whole range of viewpoints, and as you walk down from Le Maido towards Ilet Alcide, I have to say it is for me the most beautiful and spectacular footpath the island has to offer. People don’t generally take this footpath, so there’s no litter. Having said that, the ONF people (the National Forestry Commission), they come down here quite regularly to maintain the footpath, and they do a great job.

I often come up here, just with the dog who’s sniffing something down there as I speak. And we have an hour and a half jogging around here, there’s no-one to be seen. It’s a great break from the crazy life of living down by the coast. We all need to get away from it from time to time, I know I do!

Anyway, thanks for joining us, and see you next time on Anglais.re!

  

Vocabulary:

 

viewpoint = point de vue

footpath = sentier pedestre

signpost = panneau d’indication

guy = type

perched = perché

edge = bord

cliff-face = falaise, paroi

makeshift = improvisé

towards = vers

litter = dechets

having said that = cela dit

maintain = entretenir

sniffing = renifler

to get away = s’échapper

00:0000:00

78 - A Tamponnaise in America part 2 - Vocabulary

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

 

New York City. When I think of New York, the first thing that always pops in my head is a song from the Musical Annie, called "NYC." My favorite part goes "NYC, just got here this morning! 3 Bucks! 2 bags! 1 me!" To me, New York will always be the city of Broadway...because that was the big dream back when I was a kid in acting class...to see a real Broadway show! My dream came true when I was 16, during my acting class trip to New York. We saw "The Phantom of the Opera," a musical I had been obsessed with since I was old enough to talk. The story, coincidentally, was what made me fall in love with Paris, and probably what I can credit with my ending up in France...but that's another story.

 

Anyway, so here we are! NYC. 3 Creoles, 2 bags each, and one taxi to the Upper West Side!

 

We landed on the 4th of July, which I probably don't have to tell you, is America's birthday. And what better way to say "Welcome to America!" to my parents in-law, than to show up on the 4th of July and see the most amazing fireworks display in the entire country? We have a saying in the US for times like these..."Go big or go home!" 

 

I used Airbnb to find us a great apartment in Manhattan next to Central Park. I swear by Airbnb, it is so much better than a hotel! Not only is it cheaper, you also get to discover what life is really like in the city you are visiting, and usually you have great hosts that will guide you around the neighborhood.

 

So after numerous trips to The Big Apple (which is the nickname of NYC I have no idea why though...) I have devised my favorite tourist program! Here it is...Jen's Top Ten Must See Things in New York City!

 

1. GO TO A BROADWAY SHOW! Obviously this has to be first. I took my in-laws to see Aladdin, because I thought that they would already know the story and the music enough to enjoy it even if they wouldn't be able to understand a word. Broadway shows...musicals especially...are like no other show on this Earth. You actually CANNOT go to New York without seeing SOMETHING on Broadway, it's against the law.

 

2. Go to the Top of Rockefeller Center. It's one of the highest points in New York and you'll be in awe looking down on all the skyscrapers. You can tell where the really rich people live because they have rooftop gardens and pools. You can do the same thing from the Empire State Building, but I prefer Rockefeller Center, especially during Christmas time because the famous Christmas tree is there.

 

3. Times Square. You have to go once during the day and do all of the ridiculous shops; my Creole company loved the giant M&M store, the giant Disney store, and the Toy Store. Then you have to go to Times Square at night and be blown away by everything all lit up. Also I usually am against stupid bus tours in big cities, but my in-laws wanted to do one, so we caught a bus in Times Square for the sunset and actually it was one of the best bus tours I've ever been on! They took us all the way to Brooklyn so we saw a lot of the neighborhoods in Manhattan before crossing the bridge and seeing the entire city lit up and glittering at night. I totally recommend it!

 

4. Get some culture. My favorite museum is always the Met, but if that is not your style, New York has everything you could ask for. The Museum of Natural History was pretty impressive, it was right next to our apartment so we spent an afternoon there and it was my first time. I would definitely go back because you can't see everything in only a few hours!!

 

5. Walk across the Brooklyn Bridge. It's just cool.

 

6. Go see Freedom Tower. This is the new World Trade Center, constructed next to the site where the old towers stood, and where the memorial now honors the lives lost during the attacks on September 11th. There is a special tree near the memorial site...it is the only tree to have survived the attacks, and now they call it the Survivor Tree. It is a beautiful symbol of resilience and rebirth.

 

7. While you're down in the area, go see the Statue of Liberty, of course! I've only taken a Ferry out there once...and I have to say it kind of sucks. The lines are long, the ferries are crowded...it's a long day. I can see it just fine from the Pier :)

 

8. Ok for the French people wondering where to eat!! Go to Katz's Deli and get a pastrami sandwich. Nothing is more New York than a pastrami sandwich with a big pickle. Other New York must eat things include a giant slice of pepperoni pizza, cheesecake, a hot dog from a dude on the street, (with American mustard which is the BEST mustard!) and...my husband's all time favorite...Shake Shack. We probably ate there every other day he loved it so much. Shake Shack is like a high class Quick. They only use the best beef possible and it is probably the best fast food burger you will ever taste. You have to get a milkshake there too...it's in the name, after all!!

 

9. Central Park. Sit on a bench, or have a picnic, and people watch. You can also take a horse-drawn carriage around the park, which is a beautiful thing to do if you're there around Christmas.

 

10. Go to Chinatown to buy your souvenirs!! You will pay at least half the price for the same things elsewhere!!!

 

My Tamponaise in-laws had a bit of culture shock. The first day, they were desperate to find a baguette. The second day, they wanted to know why ordering an expresso was so difficult and why it tasted so bad. By the third day, they got into the swing of things, although I think they concluded that New York is not really their thing. If you also don't like the fast pace of big cities...don't worry...the rest of the country is not at all the same. 

 

There is no place in the world quite like NYC.

 

Vocabulary

 

musical - comedie musicale

bucks - des dollars

coincidentally - par coincidence

skyscraper - gratte-ciel

rooftop - sur le toit

 

lit up - eclairé

glittering - scintillant

resilience - tenacité

rebirth - renaissance

pier - la jetée

 

pickle - cornichon

dude - mec

horse-drawn carriage - une calèche

00:0000:00

78 - A Tamponnaise in America part 2 - Slow

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

 

New York City. When I think of New York, the first thing that always pops in my head is a song from the Musical Annie, called "NYC." My favorite part goes "NYC, just got here this morning! 3 Bucks! 2 bags! 1 me!" To me, New York will always be the city of Broadway...because that was the big dream back when I was a kid in acting class...to see a real Broadway show! My dream came true when I was 16, during my acting class trip to New York. We saw "The Phantom of the Opera," a musical I had been obsessed with since I was old enough to talk. The story, coincidentally, was what made me fall in love with Paris, and probably what I can credit with my ending up in France...but that's another story.

 

Anyway, so here we are! NYC. 3 Creoles, 2 bags each, and one taxi to the Upper West Side!

 

We landed on the 4th of July, which I probably don't have to tell you, is America's birthday. And what better way to say "Welcome to America!" to my parents in-law, than to show up on the 4th of July and see the most amazing fireworks display in the entire country? We have a saying in the US for times like these..."Go big or go home!" 

 

I used Airbnb to find us a great apartment in Manhattan next to Central Park. I swear by Airbnb, it is so much better than a hotel! Not only is it cheaper, you also get to discover what life is really like in the city you are visiting, and usually you have great hosts that will guide you around the neighborhood.

 

So after numerous trips to The Big Apple (which is the nickname of NYC I have no idea why though...) I have devised my favorite tourist program! Here it is...Jen's Top Ten Must See Things in New York City!

 

1. GO TO A BROADWAY SHOW! Obviously this has to be first. I took my in-laws to see Aladdin, because I thought that they would already know the story and the music enough to enjoy it even if they wouldn't be able to understand a word. Broadway shows...musicals especially...are like no other show on this Earth. You actually CANNOT go to New York without seeing SOMETHING on Broadway, it's against the law.

 

2. Go to the Top of Rockefeller Center. It's one of the highest points in New York and you'll be in awe looking down on all the skyscrapers. You can tell where the really rich people live because they have rooftop gardens and pools. You can do the same thing from the Empire State Building, but I prefer Rockefeller Center, especially during Christmas time because the famous Christmas tree is there.

 

3. Times Square. You have to go once during the day and do all of the ridiculous shops; my Creole company loved the giant M&M store, the giant Disney store, and the Toy Store. Then you have to go to Times Square at night and be blown away by everything all lit up. Also I usually am against stupid bus tours in big cities, but my in-laws wanted to do one, so we caught a bus in Times Square for the sunset and actually it was one of the best bus tours I've ever been on! They took us all the way to Brooklyn so we saw a lot of the neighborhoods in Manhattan before crossing the bridge and seeing the entire city lit up and glittering at night. I totally recommend it!

 

4. Get some culture. My favorite museum is always the Met, but if that is not your style, New York has everything you could ask for. The Museum of Natural History was pretty impressive, it was right next to our apartment so we spent an afternoon there and it was my first time. I would definitely go back because you can't see everything in only a few hours!!

 

5. Walk across the Brooklyn Bridge. It's just cool.

 

6. Go see Freedom Tower. This is the new World Trade Center, constructed next to the site where the old towers stood, and where the memorial now honors the lives lost during the attacks on September 11th. There is a special tree near the memorial site...it is the only tree to have survived the attacks, and now they call it the Survivor Tree. It is a beautiful symbol of resilience and rebirth.

 

7. While you're down in the area, go see the Statue of Liberty, of course! I've only taken a Ferry out there once...and I have to say it kind of sucks. The lines are long, the ferries are crowded...it's a long day. I can see it just fine from the Pier :)

 

8. Ok for the French people wondering where to eat!! Go to Katz's Deli and get a pastrami sandwich. Nothing is more New York than a pastrami sandwich with a big pickle. Other New York must eat things include a giant slice of pepperoni pizza, cheesecake, a hot dog from a dude on the street, (with American mustard which is the BEST mustard!) and...my husband's all time favorite...Shake Shack. We probably ate there every other day he loved it so much. Shake Shack is like a high class Quick. They only use the best beef possible and it is probably the best fast food burger you will ever taste. You have to get a milkshake there too...it's in the name, after all!!

 

9. Central Park. Sit on a bench, or have a picnic, and people watch. You can also take a horse-drawn carriage around the park, which is a beautiful thing to do if you're there around Christmas.

 

10. Go to Chinatown to buy your souvenirs!! You will pay at least half the price for the same things elsewhere!!!

 

My Tamponaise in-laws had a bit of culture shock. The first day, they were desperate to find a baguette. The second day, they wanted to know why ordering an expresso was so difficult and why it tasted so bad. By the third day, they got into the swing of things, although I think they concluded that New York is not really their thing. If you also don't like the fast pace of big cities...don't worry...the rest of the country is not at all the same. 

 

There is no place in the world quite like NYC.

 

Vocabulary

 

musical - comedie musicale

bucks - des dollars

coincidentally - par coincidence

skyscraper - gratte-ciel

rooftop - sur le toit

 

lit up - eclairé

glittering - scintillant

resilience - tenacité

rebirth - renaissance

pier - la jetée

 

pickle - cornichon

dude - mec

horse-drawn carriage - une calèche

00:0000:00

78 - A Tamponnaise in America part 2

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

New York City. When I think of New York, the first thing that always pops in my head is a song from the Musical Annie, called "NYC." My favorite part goes "NYC, just got here this morning! 3 Bucks! 2 bags! 1 me!" To me, New York will always be the city of Broadway...because that was the big dream back when I was a kid in acting class...to see a real Broadway show! My dream came true when I was 16, during my acting class trip to New York. We saw "The Phantom of the Opera," a musical I had been obsessed with since I was old enough to talk. The story, coincidentally, was what made me fall in love with Paris, and probably what I can credit with my ending up in France...but that's another story.

Anyway, so here we are! NYC. 3 Creoles, 2 bags each, and one taxi to the Upper West Side!

We landed on the 4th of July, which I probably don't have to tell you, is America's birthday. And what better way to say "Welcome to America!" to my parents in-law, than to show up on the 4th of July and see the most amazing fireworks display in the entire country? We have a saying in the US for times like these..."Go big or go home!" 

I used Airbnb to find us a great apartment in Manhattan next to Central Park. I swear by Airbnb, it is so much better than a hotel! Not only is it cheaper, you also get to discover what life is really like in the city you are visiting, and usually you have great hosts that will guide you around the neighborhood.

So after numerous trips to The Big Apple (which is the nickname of NYC I have no idea why though...) I have devised my favorite tourist program! Here it is...Jen's Top Ten Must See Things in New York City!

1. GO TO A BROADWAY SHOW! Obviously this has to be first. I took my in-laws to see Aladdin, because I thought that they would already know the story and the music enough to enjoy it even if they wouldn't be able to understand a word. Broadway shows...musicals especially...are like no other show on this Earth. You actually CANNOT go to New York without seeing SOMETHING on Broadway, it's against the law.

2. Go to the Top of Rockefeller Center. It's one of the highest points in New York and you'll be in awe looking down on all the skyscrapers. You can tell where the really rich people live because they have rooftop gardens and pools. You can do the same thing from the Empire State Building, but I prefer Rockefeller Center, especially during Christmas time because the famous Christmas tree is there.

3. Times Square. You have to go once during the day and do all of the ridiculous shops; my Creole company loved the giant M&M store, the giant Disney store, and the Toy Store. Then you have to go to Times Square at night and be blown away by everything all lit up. Also I usually am against stupid bus tours in big cities, but my in-laws wanted to do one, so we caught a bus in Times Square for the sunset and actually it was one of the best bus tours I've ever been on! They took us all the way to Brooklyn so we saw a lot of the neighborhoods in Manhattan before crossing the bridge and seeing the entire city lit up and glittering at night. I totally recommend it!

4. Get some culture. My favorite museum is always the Met, but if that is not your style, New York has everything you could ask for. The Museum of Natural History was pretty impressive, it was right next to our apartment so we spent an afternoon there and it was my first time. I would definitely go back because you can't see everything in only a few hours!!

5. Walk across the Brooklyn Bridge. It's just cool.

6. Go see Freedom Tower. This is the new World Trade Center, constructed next to the site where the old towers stood, and where the memorial now honors the lives lost during the attacks on September 11th. There is a special tree near the memorial site...it is the only tree to have survived the attacks, and now they call it the Survivor Tree. It is a beautiful symbol of resilience and rebirth.

7. While you're down in the area, go see the Statue of Liberty, of course! I've only taken a Ferry out there once...and I have to say it kind of sucks. The lines are long, the ferries are crowded...it's a long day. I can see it just fine from the Pier :)

8. Ok for the French people wondering where to eat!! Go to Katz's Deli and get a pastrami sandwich. Nothing is more New York than a pastrami sandwich with a big pickle. Other New York must eat things include a giant slice of pepperoni pizza, cheesecake, a hot dog from a dude on the street, (with American mustard which is the BEST mustard!) and...my husband's all time favorite...Shake Shack. We probably ate there every other day he loved it so much. Shake Shack is like a high class Quick. They only use the best beef possible and it is probably the best fast food burger you will ever taste. You have to get a milkshake there too...it's in the name, after all!!

9. Central Park. Sit on a bench, or have a picnic, and people watch. You can also take a horse-drawn carriage around the park, which is a beautiful thing to do if you're there around Christmas.

 

10. Go to Chinatown to buy your souvenirs!! You will pay at least half the price for the same things elsewhere!!!

My Tamponaise in-laws had a bit of culture shock. The first day, they were desperate to find a baguette. The second day, they wanted to know why ordering an expresso was so difficult and why it tasted so bad. By the third day, they got into the swing of things, although I think they concluded that New York is not really their thing. If you also don't like the fast pace of big cities...don't worry...the rest of the country is not at all the same. 

There is no place in the world quite like NYC.

Vocabulary

musical - comedie musicale

bucks - des dollars

coincidentally - par coincidence

skyscraper - gratte-ciel

rooftop - sur le toit

lit up - eclairé

glittering - scintillant

resilience - tenacité

rebirth - renaissance

pier - la jetée

pickle - cornichon

dude - mec

horse-drawn carriage - une calèche

00:0000:00