Daily Archives: February 25, 2016

84 - Reunion Island’s Staple Dish - Vocabulary

Visit www.anglais.re for more !
 
Nations and territories each need an identity. A national sport, pastime or bird are all symbols of a nation's distinctiveness. Something that sets them apart from other countries. If I had to think of a representation of British culture, for example, I would imagine Beckham in a bowler hat, eating a bacon sandwich.
 
Food is a very important icon when it comes to symbolizing a country. France has frog's legs, the UK has their breakfasts, the USA has hotdogs, but what about Reunion? What is Reunion Island's staple dish?
 
I've been on the island for nearly ten years, and I think I've tasted everything the place has to offer, I've savoured all the caris from anguille to zef. I've enjoyed every samosa flavour, tried all of the sandwiches, and sampled all the puddings.
 
There is one dish that stands out however. The ultimate dish that the other caris look up to, and strive to be like. The cari that makes you salivate at the very mention of its name. I am, of course, talking about rougail saucisse.
 
I love thee my dear rougail saucisse,
Every spoonful, every piece,
Even though you're full of grease,
I love thee my dear rougail saucisse.
 
Saucy and spicy, meaty and magnificent, rougail saucisse is probably the most delicious meal that you and I have ever tasted. It's something about the burly sausages mixed with the mild sauce. It reminds me of my favourite Italian dish; spaghetti and meatballs.
 
The British love meals like this. If I had a million pounds, I'd open up a restaurant in the UK, and we'd only serve rougail saucisse. I'm sure I'd make the money back in a weekend.
 
Now, with all this talk of rougail saucisse, I'm sure you're getting quite hungry, in fact, I think I can hear your tummies rumbling. So let me tell you the best place on the island for getting this delight. I'm on the road a lot for my job, so I've sampled rougail saucisse in quite a few restaurants and snack-bars. There's one place that stands out in my mind. The chef is a creole woman and every time she makes her rougail saucisse it's better than the last. I am, of course, talking about my wife, the best chef I know! 
 
If you would like to sample her dishes, just give me a call! You'd be more than welcome at my caz, perhaps we could wash it down with some homemade flavoured rum? Enjoy your meal!
 
Vocabulary
 
to set apart - mettre à part
staple dish - plat nationale
to sample - goûter
pudding - dessert
to strive -  lutter
 
thee - vous
grease - graisse
meaty - plein de viande
burly - épeisse
mild - doux
 
meatballs - boulettes de viande
tummy - ventre
to rumble - gargouiller
delight - délice
homemade - fait maison
00:0000:00

84 - Reunion Island’s Staple Dish - Slow

Visit www.anglais.re for more !
 
Nations and territories each need an identity. A national sport, pastime or bird are all symbols of a nation's distinctiveness. Something that sets them apart from other countries. If I had to think of a representation of British culture, for example, I would imagine Beckham in a bowler hat, eating a bacon sandwich.
 
Food is a very important icon when it comes to symbolizing a country. France has frog's legs, the UK has their breakfasts, the USA has hotdogs, but what about Reunion? What is Reunion Island's staple dish?
 
I've been on the island for nearly ten years, and I think I've tasted everything the place has to offer, I've savoured all the caris from anguille to zef. I've enjoyed every samosa flavour, tried all of the sandwiches, and sampled all the puddings.
 
There is one dish that stands out however. The ultimate dish that the other caris look up to, and strive to be like. The cari that makes you salivate at the very mention of its name. I am, of course, talking about rougail saucisse.
 
I love thee my dear rougail saucisse,
Every spoonful, every piece,
Even though you're full of grease,
I love thee my dear rougail saucisse.
 
Saucy and spicy, meaty and magnificent, rougail saucisse is probably the most delicious meal that you and I have ever tasted. It's something about the burly sausages mixed with the mild sauce. It reminds me of my favourite Italian dish; spaghetti and meatballs.
 
The British love meals like this. If I had a million pounds, I'd open up a restaurant in the UK, and we'd only serve rougail saucisse. I'm sure I'd make the money back in a weekend.
 
Now, with all this talk of rougail saucisse, I'm sure you're getting quite hungry, in fact, I think I can hear your tummies rumbling. So let me tell you the best place on the island for getting this delight. I'm on the road a lot for my job, so I've sampled rougail saucisse in quite a few restaurants and snack-bars. There's one place that stands out in my mind. The chef is a creole woman and every time she makes her rougail saucisse it's better than the last. I am, of course, talking about my wife, the best chef I know! 
 
If you would like to sample her dishes, just give me a call! You'd be more than welcome at my caz, perhaps we could wash it down with some homemade flavoured rum? Enjoy your meal!
 
Vocabulary
 
to set apart - mettre à part
staple dish - plat nationale
to sample - goûter
pudding - dessert
to strive -  lutter
 
thee - vous
grease - graisse
meaty - plein de viande
burly - épeisse
mild - doux
 
meatballs - boulettes de viande
tummy - ventre
to rumble - gargouiller
delight - délice
homemade - fait maison
00:0000:00

84 - Reunion Island’s Staple Dish

Visit www.anglais.re for more !

Nations and territories each need an identity. A national sport, pastime or bird are all symbols of a nation's distinctiveness. Something that sets them apart from other countries. If I had to think of a representation of British culture, for example, I would imagine Beckham in a bowler hat, eating a bacon sandwich.

Food is a very important icon when it comes to symbolizing a country. France has frog's legs, the UK has their breakfasts, the USA has hotdogs, but what about Reunion? What is Reunion Island's staple dish?

I've been on the island for nearly ten years, and I think I've tasted everything the place has to offer, I've savoured all the caris from anguille to zef. I've enjoyed every samosa flavour, tried all of the sandwiches, and sampled all the puddings.

There is one dish that stands out however. The ultimate dish that the other caris look up to, and strive to be like. The cari that makes you salivate at the very mention of its name. I am, of course, talking about rougail saucisse.

I love thee my dear rougail saucisse,
Every spoonful, every piece,
Even though you're full of grease,
I love thee my dear rougail saucisse.

Saucy and spicy, meaty and magnificent, rougail saucisse is probably the most delicious meal that you and I have ever tasted. It's something about the burly sausages mixed with the mild sauce. It reminds me of my favourite Italian dish; spaghetti and meatballs.

The British love meals like this. If I had a million pounds, I'd open up a restaurant in the UK, and we'd only serve rougail saucisse. I'm sure I'd make the money back in a weekend.

Now, with all this talk of rougail saucisse, I'm sure you're getting quite hungry, in fact, I think I can hear your tummies rumbling. So let me tell you the best place on the island for getting this delight. I'm on the road a lot for my job, so I've sampled rougail saucisse in quite a few restaurants and snack-bars. There's one place that stands out in my mind. The chef is a creole woman and every time she makes her rougail saucisse it's better than the last. I am, of course, talking about my wife, the best chef I know! 

If you would like to sample her dishes, just give me a call! You'd be more than welcome at my caz, perhaps we could wash it down with some homemade flavoured rum? Enjoy your meal!

Vocabulary

to set apart - mettre à part
staple dish - plat nationale
to sample - goûter
pudding - dessert
to strive -  lutter

thee - vous
grease - graisse
meaty - plein de viande
burly - épeisse
mild - doux

meatballs - boulettes de viande
tummy - ventre
to rumble - gargouiller
delight - délice
homemade - fait maison
00:0000:00

83 - A Free DOM - Vocabulary

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

When I first moved to Reunion around 7 years ago, I was quickly introduced to lots of things. Pristine lagoons, Mafate, Rougail Saucisse, traffic jams and another local phenomenon, the radio station Free Dom. Still grappling with my comprehension of the French language at the time, Free Dom was somewhat of a mystery to me.

So when I first tuned in to Freedom and I didn’t understand a whole lot of what was being said, I opted to spend my time at the lagoons, in Mafate, eating Rougail Saucisse and being stuck in traffic jams. Unbeknown to me, the latter was to play an important role in my change of attitude!

I quickly realised that Free Dom was much more than a radio station. It’s so important to the Reunionese population that some callers even state that it’s a lifeline to them. 

So what makes this station so popular with the locals? As a foreigner, I guess the most captivating thing about Free Dom is that people can ring for whatever reason they want. And I mean, WHATEVER. There’s literally a segment for everyone from free expression, to traffic information, lost property, late night dating, obituaries, politics, or quite simply – gossip. The New York Times even wrote an article on Free Dom, so enthralled they were when in Reunion for the MH370 discovery.

It’s perfectly OK to ring Free Dom if the tree you recently planted isn’t growing as you think it should, to express your sadness over the death of your favourite singer, if your parrot has flown off and you can’t find him, to tell the other listeners that is raining where you live, and then describe that rain in detail – anything is possible!

A couple of my Free Dom ‘best-of’ moments as a listener include:

 

- When a woman rang to describe a car accident that she was witnessing and after a few minutes the radio presenter asked if she’d called an ambulance or the police and she quite indignantly said, “no, not yet”.

 

- A guy who called up one Saturday night looking to start a very serious relationship, not just a fling but something that was to last. Asked when he was available to meet the lucky lady he responded “tonight”.

 

- When a lady rang in to say that she’d just got off the bus leaving all her shopping behind. A guy listening at home heard her plea and gallantly ran out to stop the very same bus, which happened to be driving past his home. 

Like it or not, Free Dom can’t be criticised for the way it pulls the community together. Where else in the world would you think to call the local radio station to find your lost credit card? Even the local authorities are known to suggest calling Free Dom to help solve petty crimes. The station is a testament to the solidarity of the Reunionese people.

For many, free expression does equate to a general sense of freedom. And radio Free Dom has done just that, liberate the local community to help create a very ‘free’ DOM.

 

Vocabulary

pristine - cristallin

 

to grapple - se battre, lutter

 

unbeknown - sans que quelqu'un le sache

 

latter - le dernier

 

lifeline - lien vital

 

 

 

whatever - n’importe quel

 

late night dating - chaleur tropicale

 

obituaries - avis de décès

 

gossip - la di la fé

 

enthralled - captivé

 

 

 

parrot - perroquet

 

to fly off - s'envoler

 

fling - brève liaison

 

to last - durer

 

which happened to be driving past - qui passait justement

 

 

 

 

plea - appel
to witness - être temoin
petty crimes - petits delits

 

00:0000:00

83 - A Free DOM

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

When I first moved to Reunion around 7 years ago, I was quickly introduced to lots of things. Pristine lagoons, Mafate, Rougail Saucisse, traffic jams and another local phenomenon, the radio station Free Dom. Still grappling with my comprehension of the French language at the time, Free Dom was somewhat of a mystery to me.

So when I first tuned in to Freedom and I didn’t understand a whole lot of what was being said, I opted to spend my time at the lagoons, in Mafate, eating Rougail Saucisse and being stuck in traffic jams. Unbeknown to me, the latter was to play an important role in my change of attitude!

I quickly realised that Free Dom was much more than a radio station. It’s so important to the Reunionese population that some callers even state that it’s a lifeline to them. 

So what makes this station so popular with the locals? As a foreigner, I guess the most captivating thing about Free Dom is that people can ring for whatever reason they want. And I mean, WHATEVER. There’s literally a segment for everyone from free expression, to traffic information, lost property, late night dating, obituaries, politics, or quite simply – gossip. The New York Times even wrote an article on Free Dom, so enthralled they were when in Reunion for the MH370 discovery.

It’s perfectly OK to ring Free Dom if the tree you recently planted isn’t growing as you think it should, to express your sadness over the death of your favourite singer, if your parrot has flown off and you can’t find him, to tell the other listeners that is raining where you live, and then describe that rain in detail – anything is possible!

A couple of my Free Dom ‘best-of’ moments as a listener include:

- When a woman rang to describe a car accident that she was witnessing and after a few minutes the radio presenter asked if she’d called an ambulance or the police and she quite indignantly said, “no, not yet”.

- A guy who called up one Saturday night looking to start a very serious relationship, not just a fling but something that was to last. Asked when he was available to meet the lucky lady he responded “tonight”.

- When a lady rang in to say that she’d just got off the bus leaving all her shopping behind. A guy listening at home heard her plea and gallantly ran out to stop the very same bus, which happened to be driving past his home. 

Like it or not, Free Dom can’t be criticised for the way it pulls the community together. Where else in the world would you think to call the local radio station to find your lost credit card? Even the local authorities are known to suggest calling Free Dom to help solve petty crimes. The station is a testament to the solidarity of the Reunionese people.

For many, free expression does equate to a general sense of freedom. And radio Free Dom has done just that, liberate the local community to help create a very ‘free’ DOM.

Vocabulary

pristine - cristallin

to grapple - se battre, lutter

unbeknown - sans que quelqu'un le sache

latter - le dernier

lifeline - lien vital

 

whatever - n’importe quel

late night dating - chaleur tropicale

obituaries - avis de décès

gossip - la di la fé

enthralled - captivé

 

parrot - perroquet

to fly off - s'envoler

fling - brève liaison

to last - durer

which happened to be driving past - qui passait justement

 

plea - appel
to witness - être temoin
petty crimes - petits delits


00:0000:00

83 - A Free DOM - Slow

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

When I first moved to Reunion around 7 years ago, I was quickly introduced to lots of things. Pristine lagoons, Mafate, Rougail Saucisse, traffic jams and another local phenomenon, the radio station Free Dom. Still grappling with my comprehension of the French language at the time, Free Dom was somewhat of a mystery to me.

So when I first tuned in to Freedom and I didn’t understand a whole lot of what was being said, I opted to spend my time at the lagoons, in Mafate, eating Rougail Saucisse and being stuck in traffic jams. Unbeknown to me, the latter was to play an important role in my change of attitude!

I quickly realised that Free Dom was much more than a radio station. It’s so important to the Reunionese population that some callers even state that it’s a lifeline to them. 

So what makes this station so popular with the locals? As a foreigner, I guess the most captivating thing about Free Dom is that people can ring for whatever reason they want. And I mean, WHATEVER. There’s literally a segment for everyone from free expression, to traffic information, lost property, late night dating, obituaries, politics, or quite simply – gossip. The New York Times even wrote an article on Free Dom, so enthralled they were when in Reunion for the MH370 discovery.

It’s perfectly OK to ring Free Dom if the tree you recently planted isn’t growing as you think it should, to express your sadness over the death of your favourite singer, if your parrot has flown off and you can’t find him, to tell the other listeners that is raining where you live, and then describe that rain in detail – anything is possible!

A couple of my Free Dom ‘best-of’ moments as a listener include:

 

- When a woman rang to describe a car accident that she was witnessing and after a few minutes the radio presenter asked if she’d called an ambulance or the police and she quite indignantly said, “no, not yet”.

 

- A guy who called up one Saturday night looking to start a very serious relationship, not just a fling but something that was to last. Asked when he was available to meet the lucky lady he responded “tonight”.

 

- When a lady rang in to say that she’d just got off the bus leaving all her shopping behind. A guy listening at home heard her plea and gallantly ran out to stop the very same bus, which happened to be driving past his home. 

Like it or not, Free Dom can’t be criticised for the way it pulls the community together. Where else in the world would you think to call the local radio station to find your lost credit card? Even the local authorities are known to suggest calling Free Dom to help solve petty crimes. The station is a testament to the solidarity of the Reunionese people.

For many, free expression does equate to a general sense of freedom. And radio Free Dom has done just that, liberate the local community to help create a very ‘free’ DOM.

 

Vocabulary

pristine - cristallin

 

to grapple - se battre, lutter

 

unbeknown - sans que quelqu'un le sache

 

latter - le dernier

 

lifeline - lien vital

 

 

 

whatever - n’importe quel

 

late night dating - chaleur tropicale

 

obituaries - avis de décès

 

gossip - la di la fé

 

enthralled - captivé

 

 

 

parrot - perroquet

 

to fly off - s'envoler

fling - brève liaison

to last - durer

which happened to be driving past - qui passait justement

plea - appel
to witness - être temoin
petty crimes - petits delits

 

00:0000:00

82 - The Truth about Catcalling - Vocabulary

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

Imagine this: you are walking down the street and you hear whistling you turn to look for the dog that might have gone missing and you realize that... Wait... That whistle was directed at you! Sadly this is not a make believe situation and this is a reality for many women in Reunion. Catcalling: the term which is used to represent a whistle, a shout, or a comment of sexual nature to a woman passing by on the street, happens quite frequently and in my experience, I don’t know any women who enjoy this type of behaviour. It is degrading, disrespectful, annoying, creepy and the list goes on.

This leads me to ask the question, why has catcalling become a common practice? Do the men who whistle, shout at, or make sounds at passing women find this romantic? Better question, what might these men hope for in return, and has it ever actually worked? 

Ok, so I am not an expert in this domain, but in my experience the most common response is that the woman continues walking (trying to ignore the comment) and the man waits for the next woman to try his feeble attempt at a romantic gesture. Best case scenario, the man realizes that this is not the best way to find a girlfriend and gives up on this technique.  Worst case scenario, the man really believes that this is a compliment and that the lack of response represents a sort of speechless admiration on the part of the woman. Which I am sure this is almost never the case.

Instead of making this Valentine’s Day episode all about why sexual harassment is never romantic, because lets face it, unwanted comments to a passing female is plain and simple: sexual harassment. Let’s talk about how we can make this Valentine’s Day romantic!

Step one: before whistling at a woman passing by, stop and consider how you would want someone to treat your sister, or girlfriend who is walking down the street. (Chances are that whistle will disappear).

Step two: tell those who are close to you how much you love or appreciate them.

Step three: (The most important step) respect, there is nothing more romantic and beautiful than respect for everyone equally.

After all, we all want to feel comfortable walking down the street, so lets spread love and not fear and remember... if you’re still looking for that special person there’s always Freedom Radio’s Chaleur Tropicale! 

Vocabulary

whistling - siffler les filles

make-believe - fiction

annoying - énervant

creepy - louche

feeble - peu convaincant

to give up - renoncer

gesture - geste

speechless - sans voix

instead of - au lieu de

unwanted - non désiré

close - proche

spread - diffuser

fear - peur

00:0000:00

82 - The Truth about Catcalling - Slow

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

Imagine this: you are walking down the street and you hear whistling you turn to look for the dog that might have gone missing and you realize that... Wait... That whistle was directed at you! Sadly this is not a make believe situation and this is a reality for many women in Reunion. Catcalling: the term which is used to represent a whistle, a shout, or a comment of sexual nature to a woman passing by on the street, happens quite frequently and in my experience, I don’t know any women who enjoy this type of behaviour. It is degrading, disrespectful, annoying, creepy and the list goes on.

This leads me to ask the question, why has catcalling become a common practice? Do the men who whistle, shout at, or make sounds at passing women find this romantic? Better question, what might these men hope for in return, and has it ever actually worked? 

Ok, so I am not an expert in this domain, but in my experience the most common response is that the woman continues walking (trying to ignore the comment) and the man waits for the next woman to try his feeble attempt at a romantic gesture. Best case scenario, the man realizes that this is not the best way to find a girlfriend and gives up on this technique.  Worst case scenario, the man really believes that this is a compliment and that the lack of response represents a sort of speechless admiration on the part of the woman. Which I am sure this is almost never the case.

Instead of making this Valentine’s Day episode all about why sexual harassment is never romantic, because lets face it, unwanted comments to a passing female is plain and simple: sexual harassment. Let’s talk about how we can make this Valentine’s Day romantic!

Step one: before whistling at a woman passing by, stop and consider how you would want someone to treat your sister, or girlfriend who is walking down the street. (Chances are that whistle will disappear).

Step two: tell those who are close to you how much you love or appreciate them.

Step three: (The most important step) respect, there is nothing more romantic and beautiful than respect for everyone equally.

After all, we all want to feel comfortable walking down the street, so lets spread love and not fear and remember... if you’re still looking for that special person there’s always Freedom Radio’s Chaleur Tropicale! 

Vocabulary

whistling - siffler les filles

make-believe - fiction

annoying - énervant

creepy - louche

feeble - peu convaincant

to give up - renoncer

gesture - geste

speechless - sans voix

instead of - au lieu de

unwanted - non désiré

close - proche

spread - diffuser

fear - peur

00:0000:00

82 - The Truth about Catcalling

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

Imagine this: you are walking down the street and you hear whistling you turn to look for the dog that might have gone missing and you realize that... Wait... That whistle was directed at you! Sadly this is not a make believe situation and this is a reality for many women in Reunion. Catcalling: the term which is used to represent a whistle, a shout, or a comment of sexual nature to a woman passing by on the street, happens quite frequently and in my experience, I don’t know any women who enjoy this type of behaviour. It is degrading, disrespectful, annoying, creepy and the list goes on.

This leads me to ask the question, why has catcalling become a common practice? Do the men who whistle, shout at, or make sounds at passing women find this romantic? Better question, what might these men hope for in return, and has it ever actually worked? 

Ok, so I am not an expert in this domain, but in my experience the most common response is that the woman continues walking (trying to ignore the comment) and the man waits for the next woman to try his feeble attempt at a romantic gesture. Best case scenario, the man realizes that this is not the best way to find a girlfriend and gives up on this technique.  Worst case scenario, the man really believes that this is a compliment and that the lack of response represents a sort of speechless admiration on the part of the woman. Which I am sure this is almost never the case.

Instead of making this Valentine’s Day episode all about why sexual harassment is never romantic, because lets face it, unwanted comments to a passing female is plain and simple: sexual harassment. Let’s talk about how we can make this Valentine’s Day romantic!

Step one: before whistling at a woman passing by, stop and consider how you would want someone to treat your sister, or girlfriend who is walking down the street. (Chances are that whistle will disappear).

Step two: tell those who are close to you how much you love or appreciate them.

Step three: (The most important step) respect, there is nothing more romantic and beautiful than respect for everyone equally.

After all, we all want to feel comfortable walking down the street, so lets spread love and not fear and remember... if you’re still looking for that special person there’s always Freedom Radio’s Chaleur Tropicale! 

Vocabulary

whistling - siffler les filles

make-believe - fiction

annoying - énervant

creepy - louche

feeble - peu convaincant

to give up - renoncer

gesture - geste

speechless - sans voix

instead of - au lieu de

unwanted - non désiré

close - proche

spread - diffuser

fear - peur

00:0000:00

81 - Bringing James Bond to Reunion - Vocabulary

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

Not so long ago, I was talking about the notoriety of Reunion to someone at the IRT - that’s the Reunion Island Tourism Board. I believe we need to do something radical to put the island on the world map, and I told him I thought we needed to be more ambitious, saying: ‘if you look at the celebrities who come here to promote the island, they’re usually only famous in France. People like handball player Jackson Richardson, actress Josiane Balasko and for big events like the Sakifo Music Festival, the headline acts are singers like M and Mano Chao - hardly big names on the world stage.’

Fair enough’, he said, ‘but we don’t have the budget to bring U2 or Madonna, do we? What do you have in mind?’

I said: ‘What about having part of a James Bond movie filmed here? That would be amazing!’

He burst out laughing, and said ‘Ok James, I challenge you - you go and bring James Bond to Reunion!’

So that evening, I got started. I was taking this seriously! Obviously, I wasn’t going to be able to call up Daniel Craig and say ‘hi Daniel, will you come to my party please?’, but I went online, found the name of the location scout who had worked on Skyfall, googled him and discovered that he lives in the south west of England and that he’s a surfer. My brother-in-law also lives in the south west of England, and is also a surfer. I called him up, and he knew the guy! Within a week, we had chatted on the phone and, after a lot of persuading, he finally came to Reunion, his packed 7 day trip organised by the IRT and the Agence Film Reunion. We saw the whole island, including a magic helicopter ride.

The objective was to wow him with Reunion’s stunning natural sights so that maybe, one day, he would bring a film crew back here to film part of a blockbuster.

The first part was definitely successful - he loved it here. As far as the second part goes, the IRT were contacted about a year later by the people who were working on the latest Bond film, Spectre. Apparently they were looking for scenery with savanna and colonial houses, which we have, but not in the same place. Better luck next time.

Anyway, time will tell. This location scout really was blown away by the scenery here, especially the valley of Takamaka and the Forêt de Bélouve. As we ventured through the undergrowth, he said ‘oh, it’s such a shame I didn’t come here one year ago - there’s a new film I’m working on: they would have LOVED this place!’

‘What film is it?’ we asked.

‘I can’t tell you, I’m afraid. I’ve signed a secrecy contract.’

‘Come on man, what film is it?’

He said nothing, but held his two fists in front of him, as if he were carrying a sword, and said ‘jjjjjjjjjiinnnnnng’: the unmistakable sound of a light sabre

Vocabulary

headline act = tête d’affiche

hardly = à peine

fair enough = d’accord, effectivement

in mind = en tête

to burst out laughing = éclater de rire

obviously = évidemment

location scout = répereur

brother-in-law = beau-frère

to persuade = convaincre

packed = rempli

to wow = impressionner, émerveiller

crew = équipage

scenery = paysage

blown away = époustouflé

undergrowth = sous-bois

such a shame = c'est vraiment dommage

secrecy = confidentialité

fists = poings

sword = épée

unmistakable = unique

light sabre = sabre laser

00:0000:00