Daily Archives: May 26, 2016

97 - A Surprise Hike - Vocabulary

Marcus is one of my best friends in Reunion. I’ve known him for years and I enjoy spending time with him. Despite our different characters we always get on, whether we’re singing karaoke at home, or taking advantage of the happy hours down at the pub we always have a great time. Until the day he invited my family and I to a picnic in Langevin.

The instructions were simple: Meet at the carpark at eleven, and walk over to the picnic area for a spot of lunch. Sounds easy, doesn’t it? It was anything but. 

As I mentioned before, Marcus and I are quite different. I am a very homely person, I enjoy inviting friends over for cocktails and rougail saucisse. I like listening to music and conversing with friends at home. Telling jokes and having a laugh with people. The occasional picnic with friends and family too but nothing too strenuous.

Marcus, however, is a very sporty person. He’s very rarely at home and his car boot is full of sports equipment and swimming paraphernalia, just in case he finishes work and decides on an impromptu dip in the lagoon. 

We arrived at Langevin at eleven, met Marcus, and started looking for the picnic area. “It’s just over there,” he said “it’s not a long walk.” Like fools we believed him. Twenty minutes later, my frustration got the better of me.

“Um, Marcus, I thought you said that this would be a walk. This, my friend, is a hike.”

 

“Nonsense,” he retorted “this isn’t a hike, you should come with me next weekend to Mafate, now that’s a hike.”

We walked on jagged rocks, under canopies, and climbed over large steps. At one point we reached a cliff-side path with an unprotected fifteen metre drop down to a raging river. If this is a “walk”, what the hell is a hike?

We arrived at the spot a little before twelve. Admittedly the hike was worth it. We swam in the freezing water of the Langevin pools, ate, drank and had a great time. The waterfall was spectacular too and there was no shortage of birds and strange insects to discover.

Arriving safely at our cars in the afternoon I thanked Marcus for the adventure. He laughed it off and invited us for a beer at the pub the next week.

“With pleasure” I answered. “Do we need to bring anything special, like a parachute or scuba gear?”

Vocabulary

 

 

despite - malgré
to get on - s'entendre
to take advantage - profiter de
a spot of lunch - un casse-croûte
anything but - tout sauf ça 

to have a laugh - blaguer
strenuous - difficile
car boot - coffre de voiture
dip - baignade
fools - imbéciles 

hike - randonnée
jagged - dentelé
to reach - atteindre
drop - vide
pools - bassins 

waterfall - cascade
shortage - manque
to thank - remercier
scuba gear - équipement de plongée

00:0000:00

97 - A Surprise Hike - Slow

Marcus is one of my best friends in Reunion. I’ve known him for years and I enjoy spending time with him. Despite our different characters we always get on, whether we’re singing karaoke at home, or taking advantage of the happy hours down at the pub we always have a great time. Until the day he invited my family and I to a picnic in Langevin.

The instructions were simple: Meet at the carpark at eleven, and walk over to the picnic area for a spot of lunch. Sounds easy, doesn’t it? It was anything but. 

As I mentioned before, Marcus and I are quite different. I am a very homely person, I enjoy inviting friends over for cocktails and rougail saucisse. I like listening to music and conversing with friends at home. Telling jokes and having a laugh with people. The occasional picnic with friends and family too but nothing too strenuous.

Marcus, however, is a very sporty person. He’s very rarely at home and his car boot is full of sports equipment and swimming paraphernalia, just in case he finishes work and decides on an impromptu dip in the lagoon. 

We arrived at Langevin at eleven, met Marcus, and started looking for the picnic area. “It’s just over there,” he said “it’s not a long walk.” Like fools we believed him. Twenty minutes later, my frustration got the better of me.

“Um, Marcus, I thought you said that this would be a walk. This, my friend, is a hike.”

 

“Nonsense,” he retorted “this isn’t a hike, you should come with me next weekend to Mafate, now that’s a hike.”

We walked on jagged rocks, under canopies, and climbed over large steps. At one point we reached a cliff-side path with an unprotected fifteen metre drop down to a raging river. If this is a “walk”, what the hell is a hike?

We arrived at the spot a little before twelve. Admittedly the hike was worth it. We swam in the freezing water of the Langevin pools, ate, drank and had a great time. The waterfall was spectacular too and there was no shortage of birds and strange insects to discover.

Arriving safely at our cars in the afternoon I thanked Marcus for the adventure. He laughed it off and invited us for a beer at the pub the next week.

“With pleasure” I answered. “Do we need to bring anything special, like a parachute or scuba gear?”

Vocabulary

 

 

despite - malgré
to get on - s'entendre
to take advantage - profiter de
a spot of lunch - un casse-croûte
anything but - tout sauf ça 

to have a laugh - blaguer
strenuous - difficile
car boot - coffre de voiture
dip - baignade
fools - imbéciles 

hike - randonnée
jagged - dentelé
to reach - atteindre
drop - vide
pools - bassins 

waterfall - cascade
shortage - manque
to thank - remercier
scuba gear - équipement de plongée

00:0000:00

97 - A Surprise Hike

Marcus is one of my best friends in Reunion. I’ve known him for years and I enjoy spending time with him. Despite our different characters we always get on, whether we’re singing karaoke at home, or taking advantage of the happy hours down at the pub we always have a great time. Until the day he invited my family and I to a picnic in Langevin.

The instructions were simple: Meet at the carpark at eleven, and walk over to the picnic area for a spot of lunch. Sounds easy, doesn’t it? It was anything but. 

As I mentioned before, Marcus and I are quite different. I am a very homely person, I enjoy inviting friends over for cocktails and rougail saucisse. I like listening to music and conversing with friends at home. Telling jokes and having a laugh with people. The occasional picnic with friends and family too but nothing too strenuous.

Marcus, however, is a very sporty person. He’s very rarely at home and his car boot is full of sports equipment and swimming paraphernalia, just in case he finishes work and decides on an impromptu dip in the lagoon. 

We arrived at Langevin at eleven, met Marcus, and started looking for the picnic area. “It’s just over there,” he said “it’s not a long walk.” Like fools we believed him. Twenty minutes later, my frustration got the better of me.

“Um, Marcus, I thought you said that this would be a walk. This, my friend, is a hike.”

“Nonsense,” he retorted “this isn’t a hike, you should come with me next weekend to Mafate, now that’s a hike.”

We walked on jagged rocks, under canopies, and climbed over large steps. At one point we reached a cliff-side path with an unprotected fifteen metre drop down to a raging river. If this is a “walk”, what the hell is a hike?

We arrived at the spot a little before twelve. Admittedly the hike was worth it. We swam in the freezing water of the Langevin pools, ate, drank and had a great time. The waterfall was spectacular too and there was no shortage of birds and strange insects to discover.

Arriving safely at our cars in the afternoon I thanked Marcus for the adventure. He laughed it off and invited us for a beer at the pub the next week.

“With pleasure” I answered. “Do we need to bring anything special, like a parachute or scuba gear?”

Vocabulary

despite - malgré
to get on - s'entendre
to take advantage - profiter de
a spot of lunch - un casse-croûte
anything but - tout sauf ça 

to have a laugh - blaguer
strenuous - difficile
car boot - coffre de voiture
dip - baignade
fools - imbéciles 

hike - randonnée
jagged - dentelé
to reach - atteindre
drop - vide
pools - bassins 

waterfall - cascade
shortage - manque
to thank - remercier
scuba gear - équipement de plongée

00:0000:00

95 - A Very British Pastime - Vocabulary

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

I moved to Reunion in 2007, and like any person moving to another country I tried to find a piece of home here. Cheese and cucumber sandwiches, for example, was easy to reproduce here. Football is as big in Reunion as it is in the UK, even English football is popular. There's one English pastime that I can't reproduce here, however. Complaining.

In England, when you see a friend on the street and you stop for a chat, the first thing you should say is "How have you been?" the second thing you say is always "Terrible weather we're having, isn't it?". This is because we Brits love to complain.

Like I said, I arrived in Reunion in 2007. One of the first things I did was to try the local cuisine! I had never heard of rougail saucisse, so I didn't order it. Instead, I went for a riz cantonais. It arrived, and it looked great. I had never tasted riz cantonais before, but I had tasted "burnt" before.

Yes it tasted like the chef put it on the hob, and then went for a cigarette break. I took it to the manager and complained. The guy seemed really aggressive about it, the way he was acting it was obvious that he had never received a complaint before. He didn't charge me for the meal, but he made me feel like I was depriving his children of a Christmas present, or something. I've never been back to the place since.

In St Pierre, there's a very famous household goods shop, that sells everything form televisions to nails. Recently they have put automatic barriers between the car park and the road. Barriers which open automatically when you enter the car park, but need a code when you exit. A code that appears on your receipt after having bought an item. But what happens if you decided to not buy an item? Well, after coming face to face with the barrier, you have to re-park your car, get out, and head back to the shop. Bloody hell.

I did this recently, and told the lady at the reception desk that the barrier system was "penible". She responded with: "It's not my fault, I didn't put the barrier there!" Ah, but that's the point! If the owner was at the reception desk, I would have complained to them! But since they're not there, I have to complain to you, and it's your job to pass on the message!

No, complaining is a very British pastime. Perhaps I should save my complaints for when I go back to the UK on holiday. At least then I can finally complain about the weather! 

Vocabulary

to complain - se plaindre
how have you been? - qu'est-ce que tu deviens ?
burnt - brulée
hob - plaque
guy - mec

to deprive someone - priver quelqu’un
household goods shop - magazine d'electroménage
nail - clou
car park - parking
item - article

bloody hell - bon sang !
owner - propriétaire
reception desk - l'accueil
to pass on - transferer

00:0000:00

95 - A Very British Pastime - Slow

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

I moved to Reunion in 2007, and like any person moving to another country I tried to find a piece of home here. Cheese and cucumber sandwiches, for example, was easy to reproduce here. Football is as big in Reunion as it is in the UK, even English football is popular. There's one English pastime that I can't reproduce here, however. Complaining.

In England, when you see a friend on the street and you stop for a chat, the first thing you should say is "How have you been?" the second thing you say is always "Terrible weather we're having, isn't it?". This is because we Brits love to complain.

Like I said, I arrived in Reunion in 2007. One of the first things I did was to try the local cuisine! I had never heard of rougail saucisse, so I didn't order it. Instead, I went for a riz cantonais. It arrived, and it looked great. I had never tasted riz cantonais before, but I had tasted "burnt" before.

Yes it tasted like the chef put it on the hob, and then went for a cigarette break. I took it to the manager and complained. The guy seemed really aggressive about it, the way he was acting it was obvious that he had never received a complaint before. He didn't charge me for the meal, but he made me feel like I was depriving his children of a Christmas present, or something. I've never been back to the place since.

In St Pierre, there's a very famous household goods shop, that sells everything form televisions to nails. Recently they have put automatic barriers between the car park and the road. Barriers which open automatically when you enter the car park, but need a code when you exit. A code that appears on your receipt after having bought an item. But what happens if you decided to not buy an item? Well, after coming face to face with the barrier, you have to re-park your car, get out, and head back to the shop. Bloody hell.

I did this recently, and told the lady at the reception desk that the barrier system was "penible". She responded with: "It's not my fault, I didn't put the barrier there!" Ah, but that's the point! If the owner was at the reception desk, I would have complained to them! But since they're not there, I have to complain to you, and it's your job to pass on the message!

No, complaining is a very British pastime. Perhaps I should save my complaints for when I go back to the UK on holiday. At least then I can finally complain about the weather! 

Vocabulary

to complain - se plaindre
how have you been? - qu'est-ce que tu deviens ?
burnt - brulée
hob - plaque
guy - mec

to deprive someone - priver quelqu’un
household goods shop - magazine d'electroménage
nail - clou
car park - parking
item - article

bloody hell - bon sang !
owner - propriétaire
reception desk - l'accueil
to pass on - transferer

00:0000:00

95 - A Very British Pastime

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

I moved to Reunion in 2007, and like any person moving to another country I tried to find a piece of home here. Cheese and cucumber sandwiches, for example, was easy to reproduce here. Football is as big in Reunion as it is in the UK, even English football is popular. There's one English pastime that I can't reproduce here, however. Complaining.

In England, when you see a friend on the street and you stop for a chat, the first thing you should say is "How have you been?" the second thing you say is always "Terrible weather we're having, isn't it?". This is because we Brits love to complain.

Like I said, I arrived in Reunion in 2007. One of the first things I did was to try the local cuisine! I had never heard of rougail saucisse, so I didn't order it. Instead, I went for a riz cantonais. It arrived, and it looked great. I had never tasted riz cantonais before, but I had tasted "burnt" before.

Yes it tasted like the chef put it on the hob, and then went for a cigarette break. I took it to the manager and complained. The guy seemed really aggressive about it, the way he was acting it was obvious that he had never received a complaint before. He didn't charge me for the meal, but he made me feel like I was depriving his children of a Christmas present, or something. I've never been back to the place since.

In St Pierre, there's a very famous household goods shop, that sells everything form televisions to nails. Recently they have put automatic barriers between the car park and the road. Barriers which open automatically when you enter the car park, but need a code when you exit. A code that appears on your receipt after having bought an item. But what happens if you decided to not buy an item? Well, after coming face to face with the barrier, you have to re-park your car, get out, and head back to the shop. Bloody hell.

I did this recently, and told the lady at the reception desk that the barrier system was "penible". She responded with: "It's not my fault, I didn't put the barrier there!" Ah, but that's the point! If the owner was at the reception desk, I would have complained to them! But since they're not there, I have to complain to you, and it's your job to pass on the message!

No, complaining is a very British pastime. Perhaps I should save my complaints for when I go back to the UK on holiday. At least then I can finally complain about the weather! 

Vocabulary

to complain - se plaindre
how have you been? - qu'est-ce que tu deviens ?
burnt - brulée
hob - plaque
guy - mec

to deprive someone - priver quelqu’un
household goods shop - magazine d'electroménage
nail - clou
car park - parking
item - article

bloody hell - bon sang !
owner - propriétaire
reception desk - l'accueil
to pass on - transferer

00:0000:00

94 - Settling Down in Reunion - Vocabulary

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

Louis Armstrong once said “When you’re smiling the whole world smiles with you”, clearly Mr. Armstrong had never been on a Parisian metro before. Unlike Paris, in Reunion if you smile at a passerby they almost always smile back, in Paris they quickly look the opposite direction. After eight long months living in Paris and with winter right around the corner I got that itchy feeling that I had become used to after 6 years of travelling from place to place.

What exactly was I looking for? Well, for starters I was enjoying the life of a traveller; living out of a backpack, seeing the world, as soon as I got bored packing everything up and choosing another country or even another continent to live for a few months. The longest I had stayed in one place was the year and a half that I spent in Japan... Until I got to Reunion Island.

I have been here for a little over three years now, which is a record for me! I have a garden, two cats and even a little baby boy, I am in every sense of the word, settling down. So, why did I decide to stay in Reunion? First of all, as I mentioned before I was struck immediately by the different energy between here and Paris, I really liked the laid back attitude, the willingness to help, and the overall friendliness of the Reunionnaise people. It kind of reminds me of Canada.

But on the other hand, it is nothing like Canada, the second biggest country in the world. I am from Toronto, which is the biggest city in Canada with three times more inhabitants than all of Reunion Island. Reunion is tiny! After three years of living here, I run into someone I know whenever I go to the beach, supermarket, even the bakery! I love this about Reunion, it is one of my favourite things about living here. I feel like I belong to a little community, but it’s still big enough not to get boring! 

Of course, I can’t forget to talk about how I fell in love with the weather. I don’t miss waking up an hour earlier to thaw out the car and shovel the snow out of the driveway just to get to work. I also don’t miss the five months of cold, on the contrary, I love the sun and warm weather, I love wearing sandals all year and my feet feel claustrophobic in socks and shoes now, I love snorkelling in the lagoon, and eating fruit and vegetables from the garden. 

Reunion is a little piece of paradise in the Indian Ocean. I am happy to be here and I don’t have plans to leave any time soon.

Vocabulary

to smile - sourire
passerby - passant
itchy - qui démange
to travel - voyager
backpack - sac à dos

to get bored - s'ennuyer
to settle down - s’installer
first of all - tout d’abord
laid back - décontracté
willingness - enthousiasme

friendliness - gentillesse
on the other hand - d’un autre côté
tiny - miniscule
to belong - appartenir
thaw - faire fondre

to shovel - pelleter
driveway - parking

00:0000:00

94 - Settling Down in Reunion - Slow

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

Louis Armstrong once said “When you’re smiling the whole world smiles with you”, clearly Mr. Armstrong had never been on a Parisian metro before. Unlike Paris, in Reunion if you smile at a passerby they almost always smile back, in Paris they quickly look the opposite direction. After eight long months living in Paris and with winter right around the corner I got that itchy feeling that I had become used to after 6 years of travelling from place to place.

What exactly was I looking for? Well, for starters I was enjoying the life of a traveller; living out of a backpack, seeing the world, as soon as I got bored packing everything up and choosing another country or even another continent to live for a few months. The longest I had stayed in one place was the year and a half that I spent in Japan... Until I got to Reunion Island.

I have been here for a little over three years now, which is a record for me! I have a garden, two cats and even a little baby boy, I am in every sense of the word, settling down. So, why did I decide to stay in Reunion? First of all, as I mentioned before I was struck immediately by the different energy between here and Paris, I really liked the laid back attitude, the willingness to help, and the overall friendliness of the Reunionnaise people. It kind of reminds me of Canada.

But on the other hand, it is nothing like Canada, the second biggest country in the world. I am from Toronto, which is the biggest city in Canada with three times more inhabitants than all of Reunion Island. Reunion is tiny! After three years of living here, I run into someone I know whenever I go to the beach, supermarket, even the bakery! I love this about Reunion, it is one of my favourite things about living here. I feel like I belong to a little community, but it’s still big enough not to get boring! 

Of course, I can’t forget to talk about how I fell in love with the weather. I don’t miss waking up an hour earlier to thaw out the car and shovel the snow out of the driveway just to get to work. I also don’t miss the five months of cold, on the contrary, I love the sun and warm weather, I love wearing sandals all year and my feet feel claustrophobic in socks and shoes now, I love snorkelling in the lagoon, and eating fruit and vegetables from the garden. 

Reunion is a little piece of paradise in the Indian Ocean. I am happy to be here and I don’t have plans to leave any time soon.

Vocabulary

to smile - sourire
passerby - passant
itchy - qui démange
to travel - voyager
backpack - sac à dos

to get bored - s'ennuyer
to settle down - s’installer
first of all - tout d’abord
laid back - décontracté
willingness - enthousiasme

friendliness - gentillesse
on the other hand - d’un autre côté
tiny - miniscule
to belong - appartenir
thaw - faire fondre

to shovel - pelleter
driveway - parking

00:0000:00

94 - Settling Down in Reunion

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

Louis Armstrong once said “When you’re smiling the whole world smiles with you”, clearly Mr. Armstrong had never been on a Parisian metro before. Unlike Paris, in Reunion if you smile at a passerby they almost always smile back, in Paris they quickly look the opposite direction. After eight long months living in Paris and with winter right around the corner I got that itchy feeling that I had become used to after 6 years of travelling from place to place.

What exactly was I looking for? Well, for starters I was enjoying the life of a traveller; living out of a backpack, seeing the world, as soon as I got bored packing everything up and choosing another country or even another continent to live for a few months. The longest I had stayed in one place was the year and a half that I spent in Japan... Until I got to Reunion Island.

I have been here for a little over three years now, which is a record for me! I have a garden, two cats and even a little baby boy, I am in every sense of the word, settling down. So, why did I decide to stay in Reunion? First of all, as I mentioned before I was struck immediately by the different energy between here and Paris, I really liked the laid back attitude, the willingness to help, and the overall friendliness of the Reunionnaise people. It kind of reminds me of Canada.

But on the other hand, it is nothing like Canada, the second biggest country in the world. I am from Toronto, which is the biggest city in Canada with three times more inhabitants than all of Reunion Island. Reunion is tiny! After three years of living here, I run into someone I know whenever I go to the beach, supermarket, even the bakery! I love this about Reunion, it is one of my favourite things about living here. I feel like I belong to a little community, but it’s still big enough not to get boring! 

Of course, I can’t forget to talk about how I fell in love with the weather. I don’t miss waking up an hour earlier to thaw out the car and shovel the snow out of the driveway just to get to work. I also don’t miss the five months of cold, on the contrary, I love the sun and warm weather, I love wearing sandals all year and my feet feel claustrophobic in socks and shoes now, I love snorkelling in the lagoon, and eating fruit and vegetables from the garden. 

Reunion is a little piece of paradise in the Indian Ocean. I am happy to be here and I don’t have plans to leave any time soon.

Vocabulary

to smile - sourire
passerby - passant
itchy - qui démange
to travel - voyager
backpack - sac à dos

to get bored - s'ennuyer
to settle down - s’installer
first of all - tout d’abord
laid back - décontracté
willingness - enthousiasme

friendliness - gentillesse
on the other hand - d’un autre côté
tiny - miniscule
to belong - appartenir
thaw - faire fondre

to shovel - pelleter
driveway - parking

00:0000:00