Monthly Archives: October 2016

119 - P*tain des Neiges! - Vocabulary

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Here is a story about my recent trip to p*tain des neiges! 

I’m sorry, I mean Piton des Neiges of course. The highest point in the Indian Ocean standing tall at 3069 meters high.

So, on the 14th and 15th of April, a bunch of friends and I decided to embark on a journey of self-discovery and endurance. We started hiking on Saturday at around noon after a hearty lunch of bread and cheese and off we went. For an hour and a half, we climbed slowly but surely. It was a hot day though, so water levels were going down quite quickly and we were desperate to fill our bottles up somewhere. The mountain took mercy on us and after a while we found a beautiful natural source of what looked like nice, clean water to drink from. We figured beggars can’t be choosers and off we continued.

The walk was going well, we were singing marching songs and playing games to keep morale high. After thirty minutes, despite everyone’s tiredness, it seemed people were less eager to walk at the back; they all seemed to want to go quicker. Struggling at the front, I couldn’t understand why, until I ended up behind the majority. It seemed something else had joined our group… A stomach bug… And it was leaving its potent mark in the air…

Before I knew it, we were all covering our noses with our hands the rest of the way to the gite, trying to reach toilets as quickly as humanly possible. Some of the group didn’t make it that far, they sacrificed their pride for relief in a bush, but for the lucky ones, and I use the term lucky very lightly, we managed to get to the gite before it was too late.

I won’t go into details, I wouldn’t want to put anyone off their dinner as they’re listening to this, but I will just say what I have learned from the experience:

First of all, on a long hike, bring extra bottled water, some baby wipes, and don’t trust a source just because nature is beautiful. Also maybe avoid eating cheese beforehand. Oh, and flatulence, much like a strong wind behind you, will help you up a steep mountain.

Interesting side note: In our room that night, each of us partook in an involuntary game of musical beds. But that stays between you, us and the mountain.

Vocabulary

 

bunch - bande

hearty - copieux

slowly but surely - lentement mais surement

to take mercy - avoir pitié

beggars can’t be choosers - il ne faut pas faire la fine bouche

 

to keep morale high - garder la motivation

tiredness - fatigue

to be eager - être pressé

to end up - finir

stomach bug -  problème de digestion

 

pride - fierté

relief - soulagement

bush - buisson

 

to go into details - entrer dans les détails

to put someone off - dégouter qqn

baby wipes - lingettes

side note - détail

00:0000:00

119 - P*tain des Neiges! - Slow

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

Here is a story about my recent trip to p*tain des neiges! 

I’m sorry, I mean Piton des Neiges of course. The highest point in the Indian Ocean standing tall at 3069 meters high.

So, on the 14th and 15th of April, a bunch of friends and I decided to embark on a journey of self-discovery and endurance. We started hiking on Saturday at around noon after a hearty lunch of bread and cheese and off we went. For an hour and a half, we climbed slowly but surely. It was a hot day though, so water levels were going down quite quickly and we were desperate to fill our bottles up somewhere. The mountain took mercy on us and after a while we found a beautiful natural source of what looked like nice, clean water to drink from. We figured beggars can’t be choosers and off we continued.

The walk was going well, we were singing marching songs and playing games to keep morale high. After thirty minutes, despite everyone’s tiredness, it seemed people were less eager to walk at the back; they all seemed to want to go quicker. Struggling at the front, I couldn’t understand why, until I ended up behind the majority. It seemed something else had joined our group… A stomach bug… And it was leaving its potent mark in the air…

Before I knew it, we were all covering our noses with our hands the rest of the way to the gite, trying to reach toilets as quickly as humanly possible. Some of the group didn’t make it that far, they sacrificed their pride for relief in a bush, but for the lucky ones, and I use the term lucky very lightly, we managed to get to the gite before it was too late.

I won’t go into details, I wouldn’t want to put anyone off their dinner as they’re listening to this, but I will just say what I have learned from the experience:

First of all, on a long hike, bring extra bottled water, some baby wipes, and don’t trust a source just because nature is beautiful. Also maybe avoid eating cheese beforehand. Oh, and flatulence, much like a strong wind behind you, will help you up a steep mountain.

Interesting side note: In our room that night, each of us partook in an involuntary game of musical beds. But that stays between you, us and the mountain.

Vocabulary

 

bunch - bande

hearty - copieux

slowly but surely - lentement mais surement

to take mercy - avoir pitié

beggars can’t be choosers - il ne faut pas faire la fine bouche

 

to keep morale high - garder la motivation

tiredness - fatigue

to be eager - être pressé

to end up - finir

stomach bug -  problème de digestion

 

pride - fierté

relief - soulagement

bush - buisson

 

to go into details - entrer dans les détails

to put someone off - dégouter qqn

baby wipes - lingettes

side note - détail

00:0000:00

119 - P*tain des Neiges!

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

Here is a story about my recent trip to p*tain des neiges! 

I’m sorry, I mean Piton des Neiges of course. The highest point in the Indian Ocean standing tall at 3069 meters high.

So, on the 14th and 15th of April, a bunch of friends and I decided to embark on a journey of self-discovery and endurance. We started hiking on Saturday at around noon after a hearty lunch of bread and cheese and off we went. For an hour and a half, we climbed slowly but surely. It was a hot day though, so water levels were going down quite quickly and we were desperate to fill our bottles up somewhere. The mountain took mercy on us and after a while we found a beautiful natural source of what looked like nice, clean water to drink from. We figured beggars can’t be choosers and off we continued.

The walk was going well, we were singing marching songs and playing games to keep morale high. After thirty minutes, despite everyone’s tiredness, it seemed people were less eager to walk at the back; they all seemed to want to go quicker. Struggling at the front, I couldn’t understand why, until I ended up behind the majority. It seemed something else had joined our group… A stomach bug… And it was leaving its potent mark in the air…

Before I knew it, we were all covering our noses with our hands the rest of the way to the gite, trying to reach toilets as quickly as humanly possible. Some of the group didn’t make it that far, they sacrificed their pride for relief in a bush, but for the lucky ones, and I use the term lucky very lightly, we managed to get to the gite before it was too late.

I won’t go into details, I wouldn’t want to put anyone off their dinner as they’re listening to this, but I will just say what I have learned from the experience:

First of all, on a long hike, bring extra bottled water, some baby wipes, and don’t trust a source just because nature is beautiful. Also maybe avoid eating cheese beforehand. Oh, and flatulence, much like a strong wind behind you, will help you up a steep mountain.

Interesting side note: In our room that night, each of us partook in an involuntary game of musical beds. But that stays between you, us and the mountain.

Vocabulary

 

bunch - bande

hearty - copieux

slowly but surely - lentement mais surement

to take mercy - avoir pitié

beggars can’t be choosers - il ne faut pas faire la fine bouche

 

to keep morale high - garder la motivation

tiredness - fatigue

to be eager - être pressé

to end up - finir

stomach bug -  problème de digestion

 

pride - fierté

relief - soulagement

bush - buisson

 

to go into details - entrer dans les détails

to put someone off - dégouter qqn

baby wipes - lingettes

side note - détail

00:0000:00

118 - Let’s Dance! - Vocabulary

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In New York, we have a saying that "white girls can’t dance!" There is nothing racist about this statement. It’s just a given fact. Of course there are some exceptions to the rule, but I am not one of them.  This cliché was pretty much invented for me.

Thank the heavens, for techno, house, electro and their easy beats. Even I can bounce my way across the dancefloor.  For a while, I thought “I got this!”

Fast forward to my first trip to Reunion Island, to meet my husband’s family. We’d gone out dancing before, in Mainland France, and that had worked out fine. The atmosphere and music was similar enough to New York’s, to make me feel at home. However, our first family event in Reunion, equipped with a DJ, made me very humble. I stood there with my mouth gaping, watching women and men twirl and shake their bottoms, effortlessly. There were specific dance steps involved, not just bouncing to a beat. Complicated, tie your feet up in knots moves, that I was convinced were taught since birth.

I will admit, that I tried studying the way Creole women were swaying their backsides, wanting to understand how to get that Maloya boogie into my step. My only saving grace is that mostly, Maloya, is a dance you do independently or with a group of friends. I couldn’t make anyone fall or stumble with my mishaps. I look even more like a pro, when I get invited to parties, where the dress code is the traditional Maloya dress. A little skirt waving and the local look is pretty much guaranteed, for the most part. I still have a way to go, until I get those booty shakes down right. It’s just not part of my genetic make-up. But I’m getting there. The right partner can help too. Wink Wink.

But nothing could prepare me for Sega dancing, for couples. This requires a tempo that was beyond me, for nearly ten years. I just couldn’t get the footwork or the hip synchronization down. In fact, I was quite certain that I was going to break an ankle trying. It made me remember watching my parents, doing their nifty, 50’s dancing, at weddings, when I was younger.

Luckily, once I gave up trying, like lots of things in life, I finally succeeded or sort of. I found that by closing my eyes, looking only at my 1.90M, husband’s chest, I could give up following the steps and just be led around the dancefloor. Sega is a dizzying but wonderful dance to me now and I no longer beeline it out of there when I hear it.

Vocabulary

 

to bounce - rebondir

fast forward - avancer

gaping – bouche ouverte

twirl - tourner

shake - secouer

 

bottoms, backsides, booty - popotin

tie up in knots – faire des nœuds

swaying - balancer

boogie - danse

mostly, pretty much – la plupart

 

stumble - trébucher

mishaps - mésaventures

way to go – de la route à faire

to get something down - perfectionner

genetic make-up - constitution génétique

 

wink - clin d’œil

nifty - coquette

sort of - presque

to give up - abandonner

to be led - être mené

beeline - ligne droit

00:0000:00

118 - Let’s Dance! - Slow

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

In New York, we have a saying that "white girls can’t dance!" There is nothing racist about this statement. It’s just a given fact. Of course there are some exceptions to the rule, but I am not one of them.  This cliché was pretty much invented for me.

Thank the heavens, for techno, house, electro and their easy beats. Even I can bounce my way across the dancefloor.  For a while, I thought “I got this!”

Fast forward to my first trip to Reunion Island, to meet my husband’s family. We’d gone out dancing before, in Mainland France, and that had worked out fine. The atmosphere and music was similar enough to New York’s, to make me feel at home. However, our first family event in Reunion, equipped with a DJ, made me very humble. I stood there with my mouth gaping, watching women and men twirl and shake their bottoms, effortlessly. There were specific dance steps involved, not just bouncing to a beat. Complicated, tie your feet up in knots moves, that I was convinced were taught since birth.

I will admit, that I tried studying the way Creole women were swaying their backsides, wanting to understand how to get that Maloya boogie into my step. My only saving grace is that mostly, Maloya, is a dance you do independently or with a group of friends. I couldn’t make anyone fall or stumble with my mishaps. I look even more like a pro, when I get invited to parties, where the dress code is the traditional Maloya dress. A little skirt waving and the local look is pretty much guaranteed, for the most part. I still have a way to go, until I get those booty shakes down right. It’s just not part of my genetic make-up. But I’m getting there. The right partner can help too. Wink Wink.

But nothing could prepare me for Sega dancing, for couples. This requires a tempo that was beyond me, for nearly ten years. I just couldn’t get the footwork or the hip synchronization down. In fact, I was quite certain that I was going to break an ankle trying. It made me remember watching my parents, doing their nifty, 50’s dancing, at weddings, when I was younger.

Luckily, once I gave up trying, like lots of things in life, I finally succeeded or sort of. I found that by closing my eyes, looking only at my 1.90M, husband’s chest, I could give up following the steps and just be led around the dancefloor. Sega is a dizzying but wonderful dance to me now and I no longer beeline it out of there when I hear it.

Vocabulary

 

to bounce - rebondir

fast forward - avancer

gaping – bouche ouverte

twirl - tourner

shake - secouer

 

bottoms, backsides, booty - popotin

tie up in knots – faire des nœuds

swaying - balancer

boogie - danse

mostly, pretty much – la plupart

 

stumble - trébucher

mishaps - mésaventures

way to go – de la route à faire

to get something down - perfectionner

genetic make-up - constitution génétique

 

wink - clin d’œil

nifty - coquette

sort of - presque

to give up - abandonner

to be led - être mené

beeline - ligne droit

00:0000:00

118 - Let’s Dance!

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

In New York, we have a saying that "white girls can’t dance!" There is nothing racist about this statement. It’s just a given fact. Of course there are some exceptions to the rule, but I am not one of them.  This cliché was pretty much invented for me.

Thank the heavens, for techno, house, electro and their easy beats. Even I can bounce my way across the dancefloor.  For a while, I thought “I got this!”

Fast forward to my first trip to Reunion Island, to meet my husband’s family. We’d gone out dancing before, in Mainland France, and that had worked out fine. The atmosphere and music was similar enough to New York’s, to make me feel at home. However, our first family event in Reunion, equipped with a DJ, made me very humble. I stood there with my mouth gaping, watching women and men twirl and shake their bottoms, effortlessly. There were specific dance steps involved, not just bouncing to a beat. Complicated, tie your feet up in knots moves, that I was convinced were taught since birth.

I will admit, that I tried studying the way Creole women were swaying their backsides, wanting to understand how to get that Maloya boogie into my step. My only saving grace is that mostly, Maloya, is a dance you do independently or with a group of friends. I couldn’t make anyone fall or stumble with my mishaps. I look even more like a pro, when I get invited to parties, where the dress code is the traditional Maloya dress. A little skirt waving and the local look is pretty much guaranteed, for the most part. I still have a way to go, until I get those booty shakes down right. It’s just not part of my genetic make-up. But I’m getting there. The right partner can help too. Wink Wink.

But nothing could prepare me for Sega dancing, for couples. This requires a tempo that was beyond me, for nearly ten years. I just couldn’t get the footwork or the hip synchronization down. In fact, I was quite certain that I was going to break an ankle trying. It made me remember watching my parents, doing their nifty, 50’s dancing, at weddings, when I was younger.

Luckily, once I gave up trying, like lots of things in life, I finally succeeded or sort of. I found that by closing my eyes, looking only at my 1.90M, husband’s chest, I could give up following the steps and just be led around the dancefloor. Sega is a dizzying but wonderful dance to me now and I no longer beeline it out of there when I hear it.

Vocabulary

 

to bounce - rebondir

fast forward - avancer

gaping – bouche ouverte

twirl - tourner

shake - secouer

 

bottoms, backsides, booty - popotin

tie up in knots – faire des nœuds

swaying - balancer

boogie - danse

mostly, pretty much – la plupart

 

stumble - trébucher

mishaps - mésaventures

way to go – de la route à faire

to get something down - perfectionner

genetic make-up - constitution génétique

 

wink - clin d’œil

nifty - coquette

sort of - presque

to give up - abandonner

to be led - être mené

beeline - ligne droit

00:0000:00

117 - Don’t Be-leave - Vocabulary

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I think I have rarely felt as blindsided as I did on the morning of June 24th, the eve of my birthday, when I woke up and realised that Britain had voted to leave the European Union. Emotionally unprepared for such a result, tears rolled down my face as the news sunk in. Later I exchanged messages with other Brits in Reunion and quickly realised we all felt the same. Touchingly, many local friends also sympathised, some of them telling me they felt almost as bereft as I did.

It may come as a surprise to many people in Reunion to realise that British citizens lose their right to vote 15 years after leaving Britain. So here was a referendum that concerned us directly, but in which we couldn’t vote. If the one million disenfranchisedBritish expatriates living in Europe had been able to vote, the referendum’s result would probably have been different. 

Now, I may have left Britain in the early 90s, but I haven’t morphed into a ‘foreigner’. I’ve never taken French nationality, and I’ve always tried to retain ties with family and with friends from my formative years in Britain. Nevertheless, I’m also a convinced Europhile: European treaties allowed me to arrive in Reunion, back in the mists of time even before Erasmus existed. And these same treaties have allowed me to live, work (and, unfortunately, pay taxes) on the island. I was even on the list of a mayoral candidate for the municipal elections in 2008. In short, I feel as much European as I do British, and it seemed to me that embracing British, Reunionese, French and European identities has never been incompatible. On the contrary, it has been instrumental in helping me accomplish much on both personal and professional levels.

However, following the outcome of the referendum that apple cart has been thoroughly upset; even if Brexit never goes through, a lot of irrevocable damage has already been done. The referendum result is a political reality that we have to deal with one way or another, and despite a probable ten-year timetable (and £5 billion bill), changes will have to happen. I have toassume that the advantages I have enjoyed as an EU citizen living in another country will end within the next decade. To further complicate the issue, although I grew up in London I am of Scottish heritage, and two-thirds of Scotland voted to Remain. The spectre of a new Scottish Independence referendum, like the one that took place in 2014, hangs over Britain like a sword of Damocles.

A few months after the result, my initial shock over Brexit has subsided, of course. Now, it’s purely a case of wait and see.

Vocabulary

 

to be blindsided – être pris de court

eve – veille

to sympathise – compâtir

bereft – endeuillé

disenfranchised – privé du droit de vote

 

to morph into – se métamorphoser

to retain – garder

mists of time – nuit des temps

instrumental – fondamental

outcome – issue

 

to upset the apple cart – bousculer quelque chose

thoroughly – profondément

to go through – se passer

to deal with – affronter

timetable – calendrier

 

bill – facture

to assume –admettre

decade – décennie

to be of Scottish heritage – avoir des origines écossaises

to subside – s’estomper

00:0000:00

117 - Don’t Be-leave - Slow

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

I think I have rarely felt as blindsided as I did on the morning of June 24th, the eve of my birthday, when I woke up and realised that Britain had voted to leave the European Union. Emotionally unprepared for such a result, tears rolled down my face as the news sunk in. Later I exchanged messages with other Brits in Reunion and quickly realised we all felt the same. Touchingly, many local friends also sympathised, some of them telling me they felt almost as bereft as I did.

It may come as a surprise to many people in Reunion to realise that British citizens lose their right to vote 15 years after leaving Britain. So here was a referendum that concerned us directly, but in which we couldn’t vote. If the one million disenfranchisedBritish expatriates living in Europe had been able to vote, the referendum’s result would probably have been different. 

Now, I may have left Britain in the early 90s, but I haven’t morphed into a ‘foreigner’. I’ve never taken French nationality, and I’ve always tried to retain ties with family and with friends from my formative years in Britain. Nevertheless, I’m also a convinced Europhile: European treaties allowed me to arrive in Reunion, back in the mists of time even before Erasmus existed. And these same treaties have allowed me to live, work (and, unfortunately, pay taxes) on the island. I was even on the list of a mayoral candidate for the municipal elections in 2008. In short, I feel as much European as I do British, and it seemed to me that embracing British, Reunionese, French and European identities has never been incompatible. On the contrary, it has been instrumental in helping me accomplish much on both personal and professional levels.

However, following the outcome of the referendum that apple cart has been thoroughly upset; even if Brexit never goes through, a lot of irrevocable damage has already been done. The referendum result is a political reality that we have to deal with one way or another, and despite a probable ten-year timetable (and £5 billion bill), changes will have to happen. I have toassume that the advantages I have enjoyed as an EU citizen living in another country will end within the next decade. To further complicate the issue, although I grew up in London I am of Scottish heritage, and two-thirds of Scotland voted to Remain. The spectre of a new Scottish Independence referendum, like the one that took place in 2014, hangs over Britain like a sword of Damocles.

A few months after the result, my initial shock over Brexit has subsided, of course. Now, it’s purely a case of wait and see.

Vocabulary

 

to be blindsided – être pris de court

eve – veille

to sympathise – compâtir

bereft – endeuillé

disenfranchised – privé du droit de vote

 

to morph into – se métamorphoser

to retain – garder

mists of time – nuit des temps

instrumental – fondamental

outcome – issue

 

to upset the apple cart – bousculer quelque chose

thoroughly – profondément

to go through – se passer

to deal with – affronter

timetable – calendrier

 

bill – facture

to assume –admettre

decade – décennie

to be of Scottish heritage – avoir des origines écossaises

to subside – s’estomper

00:0000:00

117 - Don’t Be-leave

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

I think I have rarely felt as blindsided as I did on the morning of June 24th, the eve of my birthday, when I woke up and realised that Britain had voted to leave the European Union. Emotionally unprepared for such a result, tears rolled down my face as the news sunk in. Later I exchanged messages with other Brits in Reunion and quickly realised we all felt the same. Touchingly, many local friends also sympathised, some of them telling me they felt almost as bereft as I did.

It may come as a surprise to many people in Reunion to realise that British citizens lose their right to vote 15 years after leaving Britain. So here was a referendum that concerned us directly, but in which we couldn’t vote. If the one million disenfranchised British expatriates living in Europe had been able to vote, the referendum’s result would probably have been different. 

Now, I may have left Britain in the early 90s, but I haven’t morphed into a ‘foreigner’. I’ve never taken French nationality, and I’ve always tried to retain ties with family and with friends from my formative years in Britain. Nevertheless, I’m also a convinced Europhile: European treaties allowed me to arrive in Reunion, back in the mists of time even before Erasmus existed. And these same treaties have allowed me to live, work (and, unfortunately, pay taxes) on the island. I was even on the list of a mayoral candidate for the municipal elections in 2008. In short, I feel as much European as I do British, and it seemed to me that embracing British, Reunionese, French and European identities has never been incompatible. On the contrary, it has been instrumental in helping me accomplish much on both personal and professional levels.

However, following the outcome of the referendum that apple cart has been thoroughly upset; even if Brexit never goes through, a lot of irrevocable damage has already been done. The referendum result is a political reality that we have to deal with one way or another, and despite a probable ten-year timetable (and £5 billion bill), changes will have to happen. I have to assume that the advantages I have enjoyed as an EU citizen living in another country will end within the next decade. To further complicate the issue, although I grew up in London I am of Scottish heritage, and two-thirds of Scotland voted to Remain. The spectre of a new Scottish Independence referendum, like the one that took place in 2014, hangs over Britain like a sword of Damocles.

A few months after the result, my initial shock over Brexit has subsided, of course. Now, it’s purely a case of wait and see.

Vocabulary

 

to be blindsided – être pris de court

eve – veille

to sympathise – compâtir

bereft – endeuillé

disenfranchised – privé du droit de vote

 

to morph into – se métamorphoser

to retain – garder

mists of time – nuit des temps

instrumental – fondamental

outcome – issue

 

to upset the apple cart – bousculer quelque chose

thoroughly – profondément

to go through – se passer

to deal with – affronter

timetable – calendrier

 

bill – facture

to assume –admettre

decade – décennie

to be of Scottish heritage – avoir des origines écossaises

to subside – s’estomper

00:0000:00

116 - The Vanilla Conspiracy - Vocabulary

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Have you ever believed something was true for a long time, then found out it was a lie? I guess most people experienced this as children, when they discovered Santa wasn’t real. I always knew Santa was someone’s dad dressed up in a cheap red polyester costume in the middle of the Australian summer. But a few years ago I discovered everything I knew about vanilla was wrong. This may seem ridiculously frivolous, but let me explain. I’ve been cooking and baking since I could stand up on a chair in the kitchen alongside my mum. I love experimenting, testing recipes and discovering all sorts of new ingredients.

Even when I was living on a university student’s budget, I would happily go into my local gourmet food shop and ask for their softest, plumpest vanilla bean for my next recipe, despite the fact it cost an arm and a leg. As any good foodie learns from reading cookbooks and cooking magazines, the best vanilla should be flexible, squishy and fragrant. Leathery or dry beans are flavourless and bad quality, so say the best cooks in the world.

This is what I naïvely believed, until I went to visit the vanilla cooperative in Bras Panon. At first, everything was going well. We saw the vanilla plants growing, learnt about pollinisation and harvesting. But when we sat down to watch a short film about the vanilla maturation process, I nearly fell off my chair. The guide explained how it takes many months, even years to dry outthe pods, in order to develop the vanillin inside. According to this expert, the best quality vanilla is dry enough to tie in a knot, and should be odourless. Armed with this new information, I did some more research. As it turns out, the big, shiny and fragrant vanilla pods found at many markets are known as "vanille zoreil" or "vanille touriste."

Frequently, the pods are so fragrant because the vendors spray vanilla extract on their products to entice customers. Not only is this type of vanilla lacking in taste, it often becomes mouldy after being stored in the pantry. Since discovering this, I have a newfound love of vanilla. I’ve always cheered for the underdog, and knowing that the ugliest, leatheriest and least fragrant vanilla pods are the best quality makes me happy. I feel like the luckiest home baker to have access to some of the best vanilla in the world right on my doorstep.

Vocabulary

 

true - vrai

lie - mensonge

Santa – père Noël

dressed up - déguisée

wrong - faux

 

to bake – faire la pâtisserie

plumpest - le plus dodu

despite - malgré

to cost an arm and a leg – coûter un bras

squishy - mou

 

leathery – comme du cuire

to harvest - cueillette

to fall off one's chair – tomber à nu

to dry out - sécher

to tie in a knot – faire un nœud

 

shiny - brillant

to entice - séduire

mouldy - moisi

pantry - placard

to cheer for the underdog - encourager l’outsider

doorstep - palier

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