Daily Archives: April 27, 2017

144 - Vegetarian Meltdown - Vocabulary

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As a Brit, I am used to being around vegetarians. Both my sisters are veggies, as are my nieces, brother-in-law and countless friends. In Britain, nearly 12% of the population are either vegetarian or vegan. You would never invite someone to dinner without asking them if they were vegetarian, and every wedding menu includes a dish without dead animals. (And yes, fish are animals). Every restaurant provides vegetarian options, and being a veggie isn’t laughed at, frowned upon or ridiculed.

If only this were the case in Reunion! The reaction from people can be mind-blowing, from restaurant chefs to guesthouse owners. Check this out:

Last month I was in a beautiful river-side restaurant in the east, and we asked what vegetarian options there were. Now I won’t name and shame the establishment, but it has (or used to have in my book) an excellent reputation.

The waitress’s response was awful. Embarrassing and totally unprofessional. She said one word: “Rien.” Not even “Rien, Madame”. I insisted - couldn’t she just ask the chef to prepare something simple without meat? Her second response? “Ici, c’est Créole, on ne cuisine pas avec des legumes.” I translate: “This is a Creole restaurant sir, we don’t cook with vegetables”. Now please allow me to translate once again so you can understand what she really wanted to say: “We can’t be bothered to cook something different for you and couldn’t care less if you went away and never came back.”

Me being me, I insisted further: “Come on, the people in Mafate do this without batting an eyelid! And you can’t?” She eventually came out with a plate of rice, beans and palm heart salad, looking about as happy as a bulldog chewing a wasp. A bargain at twenty euros.

Of course, this experience was not a one-off: all over the island we are met with similar displays of incompetence. One chef refused, saying if “you want to buy a pareo, you don’t go to a couturier.” I wanted to reply: “well if it’s so simple, then why can’t you do it?” But I didn’t. I simply paused and slowly said: “But what if we didn’t eat meat for religious reasons?”Ah!” he said, “that’s different!!”

This made me furious! On one hand, a client who doesn’t eat dead animals just because it’s written down in a book is treated with respect, whereas the client who does this through choice and a conscientious empathy for other living animals is turned away and treated like an idiot…

But I am confident this will change. As the numbers of people who eat less meat and fish grows, these so-called professionals will have no choice but to adapt. It’s just a question of tolerance…

Vocabulary

 

to be used to = être habitué à

brother-in-law = beau-frère

countless = innombrables

dish = plat

frowned upon = être jugé

 

mind-blowing = époustouflant

guesthouse owners = gîteurs

to name and shame = montrer du doigt

in my book = à mon sens

waitress = serveuse

 

awful = affreux

can’t be bothered = ne pas avoir le courage

couldn’t care less = s’en foutre royalement

without batting an eyelid = sans sourciller

a bulldog chewing a wasp = un chien mâchant une guêpe

 

a one-off = un cas unique

display = (ici) preuve

on one hand = d’une part

whereas = tandis que

to grow = croître

 

00:0000:00

144 - Vegetarian Meltdown - Slow

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

As a Brit, I am used to being around vegetarians. Both my sisters are veggies, as are my nieces, brother-in-law and countless friends. In Britain, nearly 12% of the population are either vegetarian or vegan. You would never invite someone to dinner without asking them if they were vegetarian, and every wedding menu includes a dish without dead animals. (And yes, fish are animals). Every restaurant provides vegetarian options, and being a veggie isn’t laughed at, frowned upon or ridiculed.

If only this were the case in Reunion! The reaction from people can be mind-blowing, from restaurant chefs to guesthouse owners. Check this out:

Last month I was in a beautiful river-side restaurant in the east, and we asked what vegetarian options there were. Now I won’t name and shame the establishment, but it has (or used to have in my book) an excellent reputation.

The waitress’s response was awful. Embarrassing and totally unprofessional. She said one word: “Rien.” Not even “Rien, Madame”. I insisted - couldn’t she just ask the chef to prepare something simple without meat? Her second response? “Ici, c’est Créole, on ne cuisine pas avec des legumes.” I translate: “This is a Creole restaurant sir, we don’t cook with vegetables”. Now please allow me to translate once again so you can understand what she really wanted to say: “We can’t be bothered to cook something different for you and couldn’t care less if you went away and never came back.”

Me being me, I insisted further: “Come on, the people in Mafate do this without batting an eyelid! And you can’t?” She eventually came out with a plate of rice, beans and palm heart salad, looking about as happy as a bulldog chewing a wasp. A bargain at twenty euros.

Of course, this experience was not a one-off: all over the island we are met with similar displays of incompetence. One chef refused, saying if “you want to buy a pareo, you don’t go to a couturier.” I wanted to reply: “well if it’s so simple, then why can’t you do it?” But I didn’t. I simply paused and slowly said: “But what if we didn’t eat meat for religious reasons?”Ah!” he said, “that’s different!!”

This made me furious! On one hand, a client who doesn’t eat dead animals just because it’s written down in a book is treated with respect, whereas the client who does this through choice and a conscientious empathy for other living animals is turned away and treated like an idiot…

But I am confident this will change. As the numbers of people who eat less meat and fish grows, these so-called professionals will have no choice but to adapt. It’s just a question of tolerance…

Vocabulary

 

to be used to = être habitué à

brother-in-law = beau-frère

countless = innombrables

dish = plat

frowned upon = être jugé

 

mind-blowing = époustouflant

guesthouse owners = gîteurs

to name and shame = montrer du doigt

in my book = à mon sens

waitress = serveuse

 

awful = affreux

can’t be bothered = ne pas avoir le courage

couldn’t care less = s’en foutre royalement

without batting an eyelid = sans sourciller

a bulldog chewing a wasp = un chien mâchant une guêpe

 

a one-off = un cas unique

display = (ici) preuve

on one hand = d’une part

whereas = tandis que

to grow = croître

 

00:0000:00

144 - Vegetarian Meltdown

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

As a Brit, I am used to being around vegetarians. Both my sisters are veggies, as are my nieces, brother-in-law and countless friends. In Britain, nearly 12% of the population are either vegetarian or vegan. You would never invite someone to dinner without asking them if they were vegetarian, and every wedding menu includes a dish without dead animals. (And yes, fish are animals). Every restaurant provides vegetarian options, and being a veggie isn’t laughed at, frowned upon or ridiculed.

If only this were the case in Reunion! The reaction from people can be mind-blowing, from restaurant chefs to guesthouse owners. Check this out:

Last month I was in a beautiful river-side restaurant in the east, and we asked what vegetarian options there were. Now I won’t name and shame the establishment, but it has (or used to have in my book) an excellent reputation.

The waitress’s response was awful. Embarrassing and totally unprofessional. She said one word: “Rien.” Not even “Rien, Madame”. I insisted - couldn’t she just ask the chef to prepare something simple without meat? Her second response? “Ici, c’est Créole, on ne cuisine pas avec des legumes.” I translate: “This is a Creole restaurant sir, we don’t cook with vegetables”. Now please allow me to translate once again so you can understand what she really wanted to say: “We can’t be bothered to cook something different for you and couldn’t care less if you went away and never came back.”

Me being me, I insisted further: “Come on, the people in Mafate do this without batting an eyelid! And you can’t?” She eventually came out with a plate of rice, beans and palm heart salad, looking about as happy as a bulldog chewing a wasp. A bargain at twenty euros.

Of course, this experience was not a one-off: all over the island we are met with similar displays of incompetence. One chef refused, saying if “you want to buy a pareo, you don’t go to a couturier.” I wanted to reply: “well if it’s so simple, then why can’t you do it?” But I didn’t. I simply paused and slowly said: “But what if we didn’t eat meat for religious reasons?”Ah!” he said, “that’s different!!”

This made me furious! On one hand, a client who doesn’t eat dead animals just because it’s written down in a book is treated with respect, whereas the client who does this through choice and a conscientious empathy for other living animals is turned away and treated like an idiot…

But I am confident this will change. As the numbers of people who eat less meat and fish grows, these so-called professionals will have no choice but to adapt. It’s just a question of tolerance…

Vocabulary

 

to be used to = être habitué à

brother-in-law = beau-frère

countless = innombrables

dish = plat

frowned upon = être jugé

 

mind-blowing = époustouflant

guesthouse owners = gîteurs

to name and shame = montrer du doigt

in my book = à mon sens

waitress = serveuse

 

awful = affreux

can’t be bothered = ne pas avoir le courage

couldn’t care less = s’en foutre royalement

without batting an eyelid = sans sourciller

a bulldog chewing a wasp = un chien mâchant une guêpe

 

a one-off = un cas unique

display = (ici) preuve

on one hand = d’une part

whereas = tandis que

to grow = croître

 

00:0000:00

143 - Wedding Bells in Reunion - Vocabulary

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

Having been a photographer and photographing a lot of weddings, I always knew that organising a wedding is a big task.  Well, when you get married in a foreign country, the number of things to get ready goes through the roof!

There's all the normal stuff - booking a place for the reception, deciding on the menu, hiring a photographer, getting the suit.... And then there's the paperwork! After visiting the Town Hall in St Paul to book the date, my wife and I very quickly realised that getting all the papers for the Town Hall would be no small task.  We received a list of the required documents and it was clear we had a lot of work to do.

There were documents that we'd never even heard of! And some that only exist in France! For two of them I had to get a letter from the British embassy explaining that they didn't exist in England! 

After a lot of long-winded overseas phone calls, we reckoned we were on the right track to getting all the things we needed.  But it wasn't over yet! A month later the papers arrived, but to our dismay, they had got wet somewhere between England and Reunion!!  They weren't destroyed but we were pretty anxious about whether the Town Hall would accept them with watermarks.  It was a nervous week waiting to hear from the Town Hall for the OK, but finally we heard, with great relief, that everything was fine and we could go ahead and get married.

By Reunion standards, our wedding wasn't a huge one.  We had 80 guests on the day, but over 50 of them had come from either Mainland France, England or Australia.. So on top of organising our wedding day, we had a lot of people to accommodate.  A few of the English and Australians hadn't even heard of Reunion, and before they booked their tickets, had to look it up just to see where it is!!

You can't come to Reunion just for a wedding! There is so much on offer here and we wanted all our friends and family to make the most of their trip and see the real Reunion.  We took them hiking in Mafate, scuba diving at Cap la Houssaye, canyoning in Trou Blanc, paragliding in St Leu and they all got to taste a real rougaill saucisse and sample the local rum!

 

Vocabulary

 

wedding = mariage

suit = costume

Town Hall = Mairie

to book = réserver

quickly =  rapidement

 

embassy = ambassade

long-winded = interminable

to reckon = estimer

on the right track  = sur la bonne voie

dismay = consternation

 

wet = mouillé

watermarks = tâches d’eau

to go ahead  = avancer

huge = immense

to accommodate = loger

 

to look something up = rechercher qqch

to make the most of = profiter au maximum

hiking = randonnée

paragliding = parapente

to sample = goûter

 

00:0000:00

143 - Wedding Bells in Reunion - Slow

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

Having been a photographer and photographing a lot of weddings, I always knew that organising a wedding is a big task.  Well, when you get married in a foreign country, the number of things to get ready goes through the roof!

There's all the normal stuff - booking a place for the reception, deciding on the menu, hiring a photographer, getting the suit.... And then there's the paperwork! After visiting the Town Hall in St Paul to book the date, my wife and I very quickly realised that getting all the papers for the Town Hall would be no small task.  We received a list of the required documents and it was clear we had a lot of work to do.

There were documents that we'd never even heard of! And some that only exist in France! For two of them I had to get a letter from the British embassy explaining that they didn't exist in England! 

After a lot of long-winded overseas phone calls, we reckoned we were on the right track to getting all the things we needed.  But it wasn't over yet! A month later the papers arrived, but to our dismay, they had got wet somewhere between England and Reunion!!  They weren't destroyed but we were pretty anxious about whether the Town Hall would accept them with watermarks.  It was a nervous week waiting to hear from the Town Hall for the OK, but finally we heard, with great relief, that everything was fine and we could go ahead and get married.

By Reunion standards, our wedding wasn't a huge one.  We had 80 guests on the day, but over 50 of them had come from either Mainland France, England or Australia.. So on top of organising our wedding day, we had a lot of people to accommodate.  A few of the English and Australians hadn't even heard of Reunion, and before they booked their tickets, had to look it up just to see where it is!!

You can't come to Reunion just for a wedding! There is so much on offer here and we wanted all our friends and family to make the most of their trip and see the real Reunion.  We took them hiking in Mafate, scuba diving at Cap la Houssaye, canyoning in Trou Blanc, paragliding in St Leu and they all got to taste a real rougaill saucisse and sample the local rum!

 

Vocabulary

 

wedding = mariage

suit = costume

Town Hall = Mairie

to book = réserver

quickly =  rapidement

 

embassy = ambassade

long-winded = interminable

to reckon = estimer

on the right track  = sur la bonne voie

dismay = consternation

 

wet = mouillé

watermarks = tâches d’eau

to go ahead  = avancer

huge = immense

to accommodate = loger

 

to look something up = rechercher qqch

to make the most of = profiter au maximum

hiking = randonnée

paragliding = parapente

to sample = goûter

 

00:0000:00

143 - Wedding Bells in Reunion

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

Having been a photographer and photographing a lot of weddings, I always knew that organising a wedding is a big task.  Well, when you get married in a foreign country, the number of things to get ready goes through the roof!

There's all the normal stuff - booking a place for the reception, deciding on the menu, hiring a photographer, getting the suit.... And then there's the paperwork! After visiting the Town Hall in St Paul to book the date, my wife and I very quickly realised that getting all the papers for the Town Hall would be no small task.  We received a list of the required documents and it was clear we had a lot of work to do.

There were documents that we'd never even heard of! And some that only exist in France! For two of them I had to get a letter from the British embassy explaining that they didn't exist in England! 

After a lot of long-winded overseas phone calls, we reckoned we were on the right track to getting all the things we needed.  But it wasn't over yet! A month later the papers arrived, but to our dismay, they had got wet somewhere between England and Reunion!!  They weren't destroyed but we were pretty anxious about whether the Town Hall would accept them with watermarks.  It was a nervous week waiting to hear from the Town Hall for the OK, but finally we heard, with great relief, that everything was fine and we could go ahead and get married.

By Reunion standards, our wedding wasn't a huge one.  We had 80 guests on the day, but over 50 of them had come from either Mainland France, England or Australia.. So on top of organising our wedding day, we had a lot of people to accommodate.  A few of the English and Australians hadn't even heard of Reunion, and before they booked their tickets, had to look it up just to see where it is!!

You can't come to Reunion just for a wedding! There is so much on offer here and we wanted all our friends and family to make the most of their trip and see the real Reunion.  We took them hiking in Mafate, scuba diving at Cap la Houssaye, canyoning in Trou Blanc, paragliding in St Leu and they all got to taste a real rougaill saucisse and sample the local rum!

 

Vocabulary

 

wedding = mariage

suit = costume

Town Hall = Mairie

to book = réserver

quickly =  rapidement

 

embassy = ambassade

long-winded = interminable

to reckon = estimer

on the right track  = sur la bonne voie

dismay = consternation

 

wet = mouillé

watermarks = tâches d’eau

to go ahead  = avancer

huge = immense

to accommodate = loger

 

to look something up = rechercher qqch

to make the most of = profiter au maximum

hiking = randonnée

paragliding = parapente

to sample = goûter

 

00:0000:00

142 - Celebrate Good Times - Vocabulary

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We celebrated every holiday in my family in true American “go big or go home” fashion. Despite our family being of Greek, Welsh and German heritage, everything was dyed green for St. Patrick’s Day, right down to the butter. My son even had a t-shirt one year that said “I’m not Irish but kiss me anyway.” We had heart-shaped pancakes for Valentine’s Day, dozens of dyed eggs at Easter, and red, white and blue fruit kebabs for the 4th of July. Christmas, Thanksgiving, and Halloween were the highlights of the year and brightened up the otherwise overcast and very rainy fall season of the northwestern United States. Any holiday was a good reason to have a fun, themed meal and to decorate every nook and cranny of the house.

Now that I have my own family, I have tried to perpetuate these festive traditions. It wasn’t always easy in mainland France to find decorations for every holiday, much less the festive spirit, but I was pleasantly surprised to see that it is alive and well in Reunion.

There are party supplies here! And we’re not just talking about candles and a few packs of birthday napkins, but real color coordinated, aisles and aisles of napkins, paper plates, and other decor. Even weddings are color coordinated and boy, do they dress up! In the states we have fireworks for the 4th of July, but here they seem to go off all the time! They really do seem to take parties and celebrations here to the next level; even I don’t feel up to snuff.

I don’t remember the last time I looked at a calendar to see what day of the week it was. When I open the window and hear music blasting, you can bet it’s Friday…sometimes even Thursday. Tents start popping up, lots are being taped off at parks and beaches, and the smell of barbecue chicken fills the air. I thought Americans were the kings of barbecue and too much food, but then I moved here. My puny little picnic consisting of a baguette sandwich and chips is nothing compared to the enormous pots and rice cookers being unloaded from the trunks of cars.

Reunion is a melting pot of cultures, races, religions and customs. The United States is for this mixture as well, and there is always something to celebrate because of it. But more importantly, everyone is welcome to join in. Regardless of your nationality or religious convictions, there’s always enough food, one more noisemaker and another chair someone pulls up when you arrive.

Vocabulary

 

to go big or go home = faire quelque chose à fond ou pas du tout

Welsh = gallois

heritage = origine

dyed = teint

heart-shaped: forme de cœur

 

kebabs = brochettes

highlights = temps forts

brightened = ensoleillé

overcast = couvert (météo)

nook and cranny = recoin

 

pleasantly = agréablement

supplies = fournitures

coordinated = assorti

aisles = rayons

to not feel up to snuff: se sentir inadéquate

 

blasting = à fond

popping up = poussent comme des champignons

lots = terrains

puny = petit, chétif

unloaded = déchargé

00:0000:00

142 - Celebrate Good Times - Slow

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

We celebrated every holiday in my family in true American “go big or go home” fashion. Despite our family being of Greek, Welsh and German heritage, everything was dyed green for St. Patrick’s Day, right down to the butter. My son even had a t-shirt one year that said “I’m not Irish but kiss me anyway.” We had heart-shaped pancakes for Valentine’s Day, dozens of dyed eggs at Easter, and red, white and blue fruit kebabs for the 4th of July. Christmas, Thanksgiving, and Halloween were the highlights of the year and brightened up the otherwise overcast and very rainy fall season of the northwestern United States. Any holiday was a good reason to have a fun, themed meal and to decorate every nook and cranny of the house.

Now that I have my own family, I have tried to perpetuate these festive traditions. It wasn’t always easy in mainland France to find decorations for every holiday, much less the festive spirit, but I was pleasantly surprised to see that it is alive and well in Reunion.

There are party supplies here! And we’re not just talking about candles and a few packs of birthday napkins, but real color coordinated, aisles and aisles of napkins, paper plates, and other decor. Even weddings are color coordinated and boy, do they dress up! In the states we have fireworks for the 4th of July, but here they seem to go off all the time! They really do seem to take parties and celebrations here to the next level; even I don’t feel up to snuff.

I don’t remember the last time I looked at a calendar to see what day of the week it was. When I open the window and hear music blasting, you can bet it’s Friday…sometimes even Thursday. Tents start popping up, lots are being taped off at parks and beaches, and the smell of barbecue chicken fills the air. I thought Americans were the kings of barbecue and too much food, but then I moved here. My puny little picnic consisting of a baguette sandwich and chips is nothing compared to the enormous pots and rice cookers being unloaded from the trunks of cars.

Reunion is a melting pot of cultures, races, religions and customs. The United States is for this mixture as well, and there is always something to celebrate because of it. But more importantly, everyone is welcome to join in. Regardless of your nationality or religious convictions, there’s always enough food, one more noisemaker and another chair someone pulls up when you arrive.

Vocabulary

 

to go big or go home = faire quelque chose à fond ou pas du tout

Welsh = gallois

heritage = origine

dyed = teint

heart-shaped: forme de cœur

 

kebabs = brochettes

highlights = temps forts

brightened = ensoleillé

overcast = couvert (météo)

nook and cranny = recoin

 

pleasantly = agréablement

supplies = fournitures

coordinated = assorti

aisles = rayons

to not feel up to snuff: se sentir inadéquate

 

blasting = à fond

popping up = poussent comme des champignons

lots = terrains

puny = petit, chétif

unloaded = déchargé

00:0000:00

142 - Celebrate Good Times

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

We celebrated every holiday in my family in true American “go big or go home” fashion. Despite our family being of Greek, Welsh and German heritage, everything was dyed green for St. Patrick’s Day, right down to the butter. My son even had a t-shirt one year that said “I’m not Irish but kiss me anyway.” We had heart-shaped pancakes for Valentine’s Day, dozens of dyed eggs at Easter, and red, white and blue fruit kebabs for the 4th of July. Christmas, Thanksgiving, and Halloween were the highlights of the year and brightened up the otherwise overcast and very rainy fall season of the northwestern United States. Any holiday was a good reason to have a fun, themed meal and to decorate every nook and cranny of the house.

Now that I have my own family, I have tried to perpetuate these festive traditions. It wasn’t always easy in mainland France to find decorations for every holiday, much less the festive spirit, but I was pleasantly surprised to see that it is alive and well in Reunion.

There are party supplies here! And we’re not just talking about candles and a few packs of birthday napkins, but real color coordinated, aisles and aisles of napkins, paper plates, and other decor. Even weddings are color coordinated and boy, do they dress up! In the states we have fireworks for the 4th of July, but here they seem to go off all the time! They really do seem to take parties and celebrations here to the next level; even I don’t feel up to snuff.

I don’t remember the last time I looked at a calendar to see what day of the week it was. When I open the window and hear music blasting, you can bet it’s Friday…sometimes even Thursday. Tents start popping up, lots are being taped off at parks and beaches, and the smell of barbecue chicken fills the air. I thought Americans were the kings of barbecue and too much food, but then I moved here. My puny little picnic consisting of a baguette sandwich and chips is nothing compared to the enormous pots and rice cookers being unloaded from the trunks of cars.

Reunion is a melting pot of cultures, races, religions and customs. The United States is for this mixture as well, and there is always something to celebrate because of it. But more importantly, everyone is welcome to join in. Regardless of your nationality or religious convictions, there’s always enough food, one more noisemaker and another chair someone pulls up when you arrive.

Vocabulary

 

to go big or go home = faire quelque chose à fond ou pas du tout

Welsh = gallois

heritage = origine

dyed = teint

heart-shaped: forme de cœur

 

kebabs = brochettes

highlights = temps forts

brightened = ensoleillé

overcast = couvert (météo)

nook and cranny = recoin

 

pleasantly = agréablement

supplies = fournitures

coordinated = assorti

aisles = rayons

to not feel up to snuff: se sentir inadéquate

 

blasting = à fond

popping up = poussent comme des champignons

lots = terrains

puny = petit, chétif

unloaded = déchargé

00:0000:00

141 - WTF is That!? - Vocabulary

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Imagine the situation. I went outside at 8pm to feed the cat. Dusk had arrived, a mist had settled on the horizon. The only sound is the rattling of the cat food as it dropped into the bowl. A bush rustled, “Must be Satan, the cat” I thought to myself. But out of the bushes came a giant tailless rat.

As it came closer, it actually looked kind of funny. It had a big fat hind which was wobbling side-to-side as it sauntered towards the cat food. It also had this minuscule face with a long cone-shaped snout. It approached the cat food and, strangely enough, didn’t seem to mind me standing just a foot away from it.

So, that was my first experience of a tenrec. I went straight on the internet to look up some information about it. Apparently tenrecs are practically blind, possibly the thing came that close to me because it didn’t know I was there! Also, the reason that it took the risk to come so close to a house is that it probably just had a litter of children that it needed to feed. Tenrecs can have as many as 32 offspring per litter! Wow.

I’m certainly not going to chase it away if I see it again. I might even leave some extra cat food out for it and its family. I’m sure Satan won’t mind. I don’t intend to eat the creature either. Many Reunionese that I know have eaten tenrec and, to be honest, I’d eat pretty much anything in cari form, but after seeing its cute posterior swaying side to side; I just couldn’t bring myself to eat it.

Another incredible piece of information I found online: Despite their resemblance to hedgehogs or porcupines, tenrecs are actually closer genetically to shrews.

Fascinating animals. Here’s a last piece of information so you will go to sleep tonight as a more intelligent human being. Tenrecs hold a world record. Are you ready for this? This is amazing. Tenrecs hold the world record for the most amount of nipples on a mammal. Up to twenty-nine of them! There you go. You can share that information with the family when you’re having your rougail saucisse tonight. You’re welcome.

 

 

Vocabulary

 

dusk - crépuscule

mist - brouillard

to settle - se poser

rattling - claquements

to rustle - bruissement

 

tailless - sans queue

funny - drôle

hind - derrière

to wobble - osciller

to saunter - se diriger vers

 

cone-shaped - en forme de cône

snout - museau

tenrec - tangue

litter - portée

to sway - se balancer

 

to bring oneself to - se résoudre à

hedgehog - hérisson

shrew - musaraigne

nipple - mamelon

mammal - mammifère

 

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