Daily Archives: March 26, 2015

52 - The Millionaires Salad - Vocabulary

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The day before New Years Eve, my landlord knocked on my door in the morning to ask if I wanted to go on a mission to buy hearts of palms with him in St Philippe. The goal was to make a large salad for a New Year's party.  I figured why not. So we hopped in our car in St. Leu and headed south. 

Our first stop was by a waterfall in Langevin where we took a quick swim in the frigid water. On the way out we stopped at a lychee stand where I bought a kilo to snack on during the ride.  We asked the lychee vendor where we can find palm trees and he agreed that St Philippe was the spot. 

At every road stand we passed I was on the lookout for palm trees for sale but I only saw lychees. When we got to St Philippe, there was still no sign of any Palm trees at the expected places. However I did see a small sign that said "Red and white palmistes for sale, 1€", which seemed suspiciously low but we knocked on the gate. 

The man was super friendly and it turns out he was a gardener and selling baby plants of the red and white palms for 1€ each. He showed me the vanilla he was growing since I never saw it on the vine before and we all had a good laugh.  Then we left with some palms plants in hand, of course.  However we still had not completed our mission. 

We continued through the wild south, passed the grand brûlée and stopped at the Notre Dame de Lave in St Rose to take some photos. Then we decided to stop for another swim at Bassin Bleu in St Anne.  Almost all the lychees were gone at this point and we still had not found any palm trees. 

Our last hope to complete our mission was to take the Plaines des Palmistes. Finally we found a guy selling some Palm trees! So we bought four. Mission completed! They cost an arm and a leg, but well worth it. I guess that's why it's also called the millionaire's salad- even if you can find them, it's expensive! Then we went home with the trees but unfortunately no lychees. 

We cut up the trees to get to the heart. Then we shredded the hearts to make the hearts of palm salad and used the leftovers for a cari. A hearts of palm salad is pretty wasteful, since it took four trees to make a large salad for twelve. But it was delicious.  It was great start to the new year and quite an adventure around the island.  

Vocabulary

landlord - propriétaire

hearts of palms - coeur de palmiste

goal - but

I figured - j'ai pensé

to hop - sauter

ride - tour

on the lookout - à l'affût

However - cependant

cost an arm and a leg - couter les yeux de la tête

well worth it - vaut la peine

to shred - ràper

the leftovers - les reste

00:0000:00

52 - The Millionaires Salad - Slow

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

The day before New Years Eve, my landlord knocked on my door in the morning to ask if I wanted to go on a mission to buy hearts of palms with him in St Philippe. The goal was to make a large salad for a New Year's party.  I figured why not. So we hopped in our car in St. Leu and headed south. 

Our first stop was by a waterfall in Langevin where we took a quick swim in the frigid water. On the way out we stopped at a lychee stand where I bought a kilo to snack on during the ride.  We asked the lychee vendor where we can find palm trees and he agreed that St Philippe was the spot. 

At every road stand we passed I was on the lookout for palm trees for sale but I only saw lychees. When we got to St Philippe, there was still no sign of any Palm trees at the expected places. However I did see a small sign that said "Red and white palmistes for sale, 1€", which seemed suspiciously low but we knocked on the gate. 

The man was super friendly and it turns out he was a gardener and selling baby plants of the red and white palms for 1€ each. He showed me the vanilla he was growing since I never saw it on the vine before and we all had a good laugh.  Then we left with some palms plants in hand, of course.  However we still had not completed our mission. 

We continued through the wild south, passed the grand brûlée and stopped at the Notre Dame de Lave in St Rose to take some photos. Then we decided to stop for another swim at Bassin Bleu in St Anne.  Almost all the lychees were gone at this point and we still had not found any palm trees. 

Our last hope to complete our mission was to take the Plaines des Palmistes. Finally we found a guy selling some Palm trees! So we bought four. Mission completed! They cost an arm and a leg, but well worth it. I guess that's why it's also called the millionaire's salad- even if you can find them, it's expensive! Then we went home with the trees but unfortunately no lychees. 

We cut up the trees to get to the heart. Then we shredded the hearts to make the hearts of palm salad and used the leftovers for a cari. A hearts of palm salad is pretty wasteful, since it took four trees to make a large salad for twelve. But it was delicious.  It was great start to the new year and quite an adventure around the island.  

Vocabulary

landlord - propriétaire

hearts of palms - coeur de palmiste

goal - but

I figured - j'ai pensé

to hop - sauter

ride - tour

on the lookout - à l'affût

However - cependant

cost an arm and a leg - couter les yeux de la tête

well worth it - vaut la peine

to shred - ràper

the leftovers - les reste

00:0000:00

52 - The Millionaires’ Salad

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

The day before New Years Eve, my landlord knocked on my door in the morning to ask if I wanted to go on a mission to buy hearts of palms with him in St Philippe. The goal was to make a large salad for a New Year's party.  I figured why not. So we hopped in our car in St. Leu and headed south. 

Our first stop was by a waterfall in Langevin where we took a quick swim in the frigid water. On the way out we stopped at a lychee stand where I bought a kilo to snack on during the ride.  We asked the lychee vendor where we can find palm trees and he agreed that St Philippe was the spot. 

At every road stand we passed I was on the lookout for palm trees for sale but I only saw lychees. When we got to St Philippe, there was still no sign of any Palm trees at the expected places. However I did see a small sign that said "Red and white palmistes for sale, 1€", which seemed suspiciously low but we knocked on the gate. 

The man was super friendly and it turns out he was a gardener and selling baby plants of the red and white palms for 1€ each. He showed me the vanilla he was growing since I never saw it on the vine before and we all had a good laugh.  Then we left with some palms plants in hand, of course.  However we still had not completed our mission. 

We continued through the wild south, passed the grand brûlée and stopped at the Notre Dame de Lave in St Rose to take some photos. Then we decided to stop for another swim at Bassin Bleu in St Anne.  Almost all the lychees were gone at this point and we still had not found any palm trees. 

Our last hope to complete our mission was to take the Plaines des Palmistes. Finally we found a guy selling some Palm trees! So we bought four. Mission completed! They cost an arm and a leg, but well worth it. I guess that's why it's also called the millionaire's salad- even if you can find them, it's expensive! Then we went home with the trees but unfortunately no lychees. 

We cut up the trees to get to the heart. Then we shredded the hearts to make the hearts of palm salad and used the leftovers for a cari. A hearts of palm salad is pretty wasteful, since it took four trees to make a large salad for twelve. But it was delicious.  It was great start to the new year and quite an adventure around the island.  

Vocabulary

landlord - propriétaire

hearts of palms - coeur de palmiste

goal - but

I figured - j'ai pensé

to hop - sauter

ride - tour

on the lookout - à l'affût

However - cependant

cost an arm and a leg - couter les yeux de la tête

well worth it - vaut la peine

to shred - ràper

the leftovers - les reste

00:0000:00

51 - Verges - Vocabulary

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For Reunion Island, the 20th century was one of massive change. Reunionese men went off to fight in the trenches during the Great War, waves of immigrants from China and Madagascar continued in the 1920s, the Second World war brought great hardship to the island, the rise of communism had a huge impact on the island during the 1950s and 60s, and let’s not forget the arrival of the supermarket and the accompanying consumerism in the 80s and 90s.

 

Looking at the last century, there is one family which does stand out from the others. The name is Vergès, and whether it’s the patriarch Raymond, the two twins Paul and Jacques, or the grandchildren Françoise, Laurent or Pierre, no-one can deny that the family has had an incomparable influence on the island.

 

Born in Reunion in 1882, Raymond Vergès was both a doctor and engineer, with many travels taking him to work in China, Siam, Thailand and Laos. It was in Siam that he met his first wife, and two twins were born in 1925. His wife died three years later and, back in Reunion in 1931, he became a French Member of Parliament.

 

His two anti-colonialist sons would continue to make the headlines. They were both members of the Free French Forces in WW 2, and Paul was even parachuted into France behind enemy lines. Reunion then became a French Department, and in 1946 Paul was accused of organising the assassination of political rival Alexis De Villeneuve, who was gunned down in the street. Paul Vergès launched the Communist Party from 1959, and has been an MP, an MEP, a Senator and President of the Regional Council.

 

His brother’s path lay beyond the shores of Reunion Island. While studying to be a lawyer in Paris, Jacques became close friends with future Cambodian dictator Pol Pot. He rose to notoriety when defending an anti-French Algerian guerrilla who was convicted of blowing up a café and killing eleven people inside it. She had been sentenced to death, but with Jacques as her lawyer, she was pardoned and freed. Jacques converted to Islam, and they married some years later.

 

His further clients included Nazi war criminal Klaus Barbie, Venezuelan terrorist Carlos the Jackal, and the former Khmer Rouge head of state. He offered to represent Serbian tyrant Slobodan Milosevic was even on the shortlist to defend Saddam Hussein back in 2003. He died in Paris in 2013.

 

On a personal note, I have had the honour of interpreting for Paul Vergès, and found that his messages about overpopulation and the importance of energy autonomy are warnings that must be heeded as the 21st century progresses.

 

Vocabulary:

 

trenches = les tranchées

 

hardship = rudes épreuves 

 

to stand out = se démarquer

 

whether = que ce soit

 

twins = jumeaux

 

to make the headlines = faire la une

 

gunned down = abattu par balles

 

lawyer = avocat

 

blowing up = faire exploser

 

to heed = tenir compte

00:0000:00

51 - Verges - Slow

Visit www.anglais.re for more !

For Reunion Island, the 20th century was one of massive change. Reunionese men went off to fight in the trenches during the Great War, waves of immigrants from China and Madagascar continued in the 1920s, the Second World war brought great hardship to the island, the rise of communism had a huge impact on the island during the 1950s and 60s, and let’s not forget the arrival of the supermarket and the accompanying consumerism in the 80s and 90s.

 

Looking at the last century, there is one family which does stand out from the others. The name is Vergès, and whether it’s the patriarch Raymond, the two twins Paul and Jacques, or the grandchildren Françoise, Laurent or Pierre, no-one can deny that the family has had an incomparable influence on the island.

 

Born in Reunion in 1882, Raymond Vergès was both a doctor and engineer, with many travels taking him to work in China, Siam, Thailand and Laos. It was in Siam that he met his first wife, and two twins were born in 1925. His wife died three years later and, back in Reunion in 1931, he became a French Member of Parliament.

 

His two anti-colonialist sons would continue to make the headlines. They were both members of the Free French Forces in WW 2, and Paul was even parachuted into France behind enemy lines. Reunion then became a French Department, and in 1946 Paul was accused of organising the assassination of political rival Alexis De Villeneuve, who was gunned down in the street. Paul Vergès launched the Communist Party from 1959, and has been an MP, an MEP, a Senator and President of the Regional Council.

 

His brother’s path lay beyond the shores of Reunion Island. While studying to be a lawyer in Paris, Jacques became close friends with future Cambodian dictator Pol Pot. He rose to notoriety when defending an anti-French Algerian guerrilla who was convicted of blowing up a café and killing eleven people inside it. She had been sentenced to death, but with Jacques as her lawyer, she was pardoned and freed. Jacques converted to Islam, and they married some years later.

 

His further clients included Nazi war criminal Klaus Barbie, Venezuelan terrorist Carlos the Jackal, and the former Khmer Rouge head of state. He offered to represent Serbian tyrant Slobodan Milosevic was even on the shortlist to defend Saddam Hussein back in 2003. He died in Paris in 2013.

 

On a personal note, I have had the honour of interpreting for Paul Vergès, and found that his messages about overpopulation and the importance of energy autonomy are warnings that must be heeded as the 21st century progresses.

 

Vocabulary:

 

trenches = les tranchées

 

hardship = rudes épreuves 

 

to stand out = se démarquer

 

whether = que ce soit

 

twins = jumeaux

 

to make the headlines = faire la une

 

gunned down = abattu par balles

 

lawyer = avocat

 

blowing up = faire exploser

 

to heed = tenir compte

00:0000:00

51 - Verges

Visit www.anglais.re for more !

For Reunion Island, the 20th century was one of massive change. Reunionese men went off to fight in the trenches during the Great War, waves of immigrants from China and Madagascar continued in the 1920s, the Second World war brought great hardship to the island, the rise of communism had a huge impact on the island during the 1950s and 60s, and let’s not forget the arrival of the supermarket and the accompanying consumerism in the 80s and 90s.

Looking at the last century, there is one family which does stand out from the others. The name is Vergès, and whether it’s the patriarch Raymond, the two twins Paul and Jacques, or the grandchildren Françoise, Laurent or Pierre, no-one can deny that the family has had an incomparable influence on the island.

Born in Reunion in 1882, Raymond Vergès was both a doctor and engineer, with many travels taking him to work in China, Siam, Thailand and Laos. It was in Siam that he met his first wife, and two twins were born in 1925. His wife died three years later and, back in Reunion in 1931, he became a French Member of Parliament.

His two anti-colonialist sons would continue to make the headlines. They were both members of the Free French Forces in WW 2, and Paul was even parachuted into France behind enemy lines. Reunion then became a French Department, and in 1946 Paul was accused of organising the assassination of political rival Alexis De Villeneuve, who was gunned down in the street. Paul Vergès launched the Communist Party from 1959, and has been an MP, an MEP, a Senator and President of the Regional Council.

His brother’s path lay beyond the shores of Reunion Island. While studying to be a lawyer in Paris, Jacques became close friends with future Cambodian dictator Pol Pot. He rose to notoriety when defending an anti-French Algerian guerrilla who was convicted of blowing up a café and killing eleven people inside it. She had been sentenced to death, but with Jacques as her lawyer, she was pardoned and freed. Jacques converted to Islam, and they married some years later.

His further clients included Nazi war criminal Klaus Barbie, Venezuelan terrorist Carlos the Jackal, and the former Khmer Rouge head of state. He offered to represent Serbian tyrant Slobodan Milosevic was even on the shortlist to defend Saddam Hussein back in 2003. He died in Paris in 2013.

On a personal note, I have had the honour of interpreting for Paul Vergès, and found that his messages about overpopulation and the importance of energy autonomy are warnings that must be heeded as the 21st century progresses.

Vocabulary:

trenches = les tranchées

hardship = rudes épreuves 

to stand out = se démarquer

whether = que ce soit

twins = jumeaux

to make the headlines = faire la une

gunned down = abattu par balles

lawyer = avocat

blowing up = faire exploser

to heed = tenir compte

00:0000:00

50 - The Strikes and I - Vocabulary

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Before I came to live in Reunion I'd heard of the French reputation for going on strike whenever possible, or necessary, whichever way we see it. But I hadn't realised how true this was, and how often I'd have to be involved with, or a victim of these strikes.

 


It all started back in 2006 when I was first an English assistant. Teachers were going on strike nationwide, I can't remember why exactly, and my boyfriend, who is a music teacher was going to get together with a group of fellow 'Education Nationale' musicians and play outside of the town hall. Now, I honestly cannot remember why that strike came about, but I can tell you that it was a very exciting introduction to the world of French strikes. At one point, chanting along to words I couldn't really understand (my French wasn't that great) and to the sound of banging snare drums, I decided that the French were great, and whichever Frenchman had decided to invent strikes must have been a great man. I’d call this the ‘Naïve’ stage. 

And that's as far as my love of strikes has gone so far. The next stage of my evolving relationship with strikes was being baffled by a generally dissatisfied group of people taking their anger out on another generally clueless group of people. I’d call this the ‘Confusing’ stage. Confusing to me firstly because I found it hard to understand what the strikes were really about, and secondly because I always got the impression that at least half of those striking actually didn’t understand why they were striking in the first place. For fun, maybe? At that point, I started questioning the greatness of the Frenchman who’d invented the concept of a strike. 

 

The following stage, which I’d call the ‘What’s the point?’ stage, came about when I started to seriously question whether all these strikes were effective. There wasn’t really a direct impact on my everyday life, not any that was tangible enough to call for a strong enough reaction on my part. And that was the problem. I found myself wondering whether all these strikes were getting any results. Surely they must have been, for many. 

 


The last drop came when, this week, I had to queue for two hours to get some petrol, in the scorching heat, to the sound of a local radio station where I could get constant updates on the situation. Now, don't get me wrong, I do like this radio station. But 15 minutes at a time and with air conditioning or a good fan. I think I’ll call this the ‘I’ve had it with strikes that I know nothing about’ stage. 

 


Maybe it’s the fact that I’ve aged. Maybe I’m just selfish. There certainly are situations which call for action. I’m just not sure striking is the way forward.

 
Vocabulary
 
to go on strike - faire la grève
whichever - quel que soit qui
involved - impliqué
town hall - mairie
baffled - déconcerté
 
dissatisfied - mécontent
clueless - désemparés
everyday life - la vie quotidienne
scorching heat - chaleur torride
updates - mises à jour
 
air conditioning - climatisation
selfish - égoïste
 
 
00:0000:00

50 - The Strikes and I - Slow

Visit www.anglais.re for more !

Before I came to live in Reunion I'd heard of the French reputation for going on strike whenever possible, or necessary, whichever way we see it. But I hadn't realised how true this was, and how often I'd have to be involved with, or a victim of these strikes.

 


It all started back in 2006 when I was first an English assistant. Teachers were going on strike nationwide, I can't remember why exactly, and my boyfriend, who is a music teacher was going to get together with a group of fellow 'Education Nationale' musicians and play outside of the town hall. Now, I honestly cannot remember why that strike came about, but I can tell you that it was a very exciting introduction to the world of French strikes. At one point, chanting along to words I couldn't really understand (my French wasn't that great) and to the sound of banging snare drums, I decided that the French were great, and whichever Frenchman had decided to invent strikes must have been a great man. I’d call this the ‘Naïve’ stage. 

And that's as far as my love of strikes has gone so far. The next stage of my evolving relationship with strikes was being baffled by a generally dissatisfied group of people taking their anger out on another generally clueless group of people. I’d call this the ‘Confusing’ stage. Confusing to me firstly because I found it hard to understand what the strikes were really about, and secondly because I always got the impression that at least half of those striking actually didn’t understand why they were striking in the first place. For fun, maybe? At that point, I started questioning the greatness of the Frenchman who’d invented the concept of a strike. 

 

The following stage, which I’d call the ‘What’s the point?’ stage, came about when I started to seriously question whether all these strikes were effective. There wasn’t really a direct impact on my everyday life, not any that was tangible enough to call for a strong enough reaction on my part. And that was the problem. I found myself wondering whether all these strikes were getting any results. Surely they must have been, for many. 

 


The last drop came when, this week, I had to queue for two hours to get some petrol, in the scorching heat, to the sound of a local radio station where I could get constant updates on the situation. Now, don't get me wrong, I do like this radio station. But 15 minutes at a time and with air conditioning or a good fan. I think I’ll call this the ‘I’ve had it with strikes that I know nothing about’ stage. 

 


Maybe it’s the fact that I’ve aged. Maybe I’m just selfish. There certainly are situations which call for action. I’m just not sure striking is the way forward.

 
Vocabulary
 
to go on strike - faire la grève
whichever - quel que soit qui
involved - impliqué
town hall - mairie
baffled - déconcerté
 
dissatisfied - mécontent
clueless - désemparés
everyday life - la vie quotidienne
scorching heat - chaleur torride
updates - mises à jour
 
air conditioning - climatisation
selfish - égoïste
 
 
00:0000:00

50 - The Strikes and I

Visit www.anglais.re for more !

Before I came to live in Reunion I'd heard of the French reputation for going on strike whenever possible, or necessary, whichever way we see it. But I hadn't realised how true this was, and how often I'd have to be involved with, or a victim of these strikes.


It all started back in 2006 when I was first an English assistant. Teachers were going on strike nationwide, I can't remember why exactly, and my boyfriend, who is a music teacher was going to get together with a group of fellow 'Education Nationale' musicians and play outside of the town hall. Now, I honestly cannot remember why that strike came about, but I can tell you that it was a very exciting introduction to the world of French strikes. At one point, chanting along to words I couldn't really understand (my French wasn't that great) and to the sound of banging snare drums, I decided that the French were great, and whichever Frenchman had decided to invent strikes must have been a great man. I’d call this the ‘Naïve’ stage. 

And that's as far as my love of strikes has gone so far. The next stage of my evolving relationship with strikes was being baffled by a generally dissatisfied group of people taking their anger out on another generally clueless group of people. I’d call this the ‘Confusing’ stage. Confusing to me firstly because I found it hard to understand what the strikes were really about, and secondly because I always got the impression that at least half of those striking actually didn’t understand why they were striking in the first place. For fun, maybe? At that point, I started questioning the greatness of the Frenchman who’d invented the concept of a strike. 

The following stage, which I’d call the ‘What’s the point?’ stage, came about when I started to seriously question whether all these strikes were effective. There wasn’t really a direct impact on my everyday life, not any that was tangible enough to call for a strong enough reaction on my part. And that was the problem. I found myself wondering whether all these strikes were getting any results. Surely they must have been, for many. 


The last drop came when, this week, I had to queue for two hours to get some petrol, in the scorching heat, to the sound of a local radio station where I could get constant updates on the situation. Now, don't get me wrong, I do like this radio station. But 15 minutes at a time and with air conditioning or a good fan. I think I’ll call this the ‘I’ve had it with strikes that I know nothing about’ stage. 


Maybe it’s the fact that I’ve aged. Maybe I’m just selfish. There certainly are situations which call for action. I’m just not sure striking is the way forward.


Vocabulary

to go on strike - faire la grève
whichever - quel que soit qui
involved - impliqué
town hall - mairie
baffled - déconcerté

dissatisfied - mécontent
clueless - désemparés
everyday life - la vie quotidienne
scorching heat - chaleur torride
updates - mises à jour

air conditioning - climatisation
selfish - égoïste



00:0000:00

49 - All Dubbed Out - Vocabulary

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Dubbing. A concept which is completely beyond my realm of comprehension. So much so, that before living in France I didn’t really know much about it.  I had heard that some European countries did this odd thing where, instead of just putting subtitles on the screen, people were employed to speak, in their own language, in place of the original actors. I found this truly mesmerising having grown up in a country where dubbing doesn’t exist. In Australia, if you want to see a film that happens to be Spanish, well it stays in Spanish and you have a constant stream of nifty subtitles to ensure you understand what’s going on.

So when I arrived in France you could imagine my surprise to find out that George Clooney spoke fluent French! (Whereas I though he was only capable of asking ‘What else?’) But everyone else did as well. Every single actor seemed to speak fluent French. Except there was just one glitch, I didn’t recognise their voices. Two glitches actually, there mouths weren’t moving at the same time as the French voice which just seemed all a little unconvincing.

Let’s have a look at just a few of the advantages of leaving film and TV in its original language.

  1. a) Studies have shown that foreign language acquisition is made easier as a result of watching films and TV in their original language, especially when it comes to
  2. b) Studies have also proved that ones reading and writing skills increase dramatically as a result of subtitles. This makes perfect sense. If even half the time that kids spend in front of the TV is used reading in their own language, well then of course they are going to master it earlier.
  3. c) Accents! Films where several languages and accents are used are completely lost in dubbed films were everyone miraculously speaks the same language.

Now let’s have a look at some of the excuses I often hear when I tackle the subject of subtitles with friends and acquaintances

  1. a) It’s too hard (reading & watching).

It’s really not. Speak to most Australians or English people who’ve had no choice but to read subtitles whilst watching foreign films and they’ll tell you that they don’t even realise they’re doing both at the same time. It’s just a matter of habit.

  1. b) If all English speaking films and TV were left in English then our children wouldn’t be able to speak French properly.

False. See b) above.

  1. c) If dubbing didn’t exist, the French language would die out.

Admittedly, us Anglophones are more advantaged by the amount of English speaking material available which notably comes from America. But whilst Hollywood is a difficult industry to rival, perhaps if English films were left in English then more French TV series would pop-up and more funding would be pumped into the French Film Industry.

  1. d) But the guy that dubs Colin Firth has a really great voice.

He may well do. But it’s not Colin’s! Voices are unique and undisputedly shape the way others perceive us. Could you imagine yourself being dubbed into another language? Would you feel as though the audience was getting a true glimpse of who you were?

Our voice and intonation, which ultimately determine the way in which we express ourselves, are intrinsically linked to our own culture. I just couldn’t imagine seeing La Vita Bella dubbed into English. This would be a gross injustice to Roberto Benigni and the film itself. As would watching Marion Cotillard play Edith Piaf be, in La Vie en Rose. The list, my friends, goes on…

Anyway, that’s enough of a rant for one day. Times are definitely changing in France with more and more people, especially parents, seeing the benefits of watching films in their original version, regardless of the language.

Reunion Island is definitely in a transitional stage with cinemas gradually starting to put on more “VO” films. Our English Evenings at Ciné Cambaie have proved a huge success and it’s great to see the Reunion population embracing the change!

Vocabulary

beyond my realm of comprehension - ça me dépasse complètement 

 

odd - bizarre

 

subtitles - sous-titres

 

employed - embauché

 

stream - flot

 

 

nifty - ingénieux

 

fluent - couramment

 

whereas - tandis que

 

glitch - bug, problème

 

it comes to - il s’agit de

 

 

to tackle - aborder

 

acquaintances - connaissances

 

pop-up - apparaître

 

funding - financement

 

rant - coup de gueule 

 

 

 

regardless - peu import

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