Monthly Archives: August 2015

70 - My First Vegetable Patch - Vocabulary

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My last trip back home to England was in May for my beautiful cousin's beautiful wedding. Springtime in 'Sunny Devon' is really something. The countryside is really green after a long winter of rain, and the flowers are gorgeous.

My family all have green fingers, with stunning gardens. And yet, I live on a paradise island and, looking at my garden, you can see that I missed out on this gene. I was both inspired and determined. My new project for these winter holidays? To start my very own vegetable patch!

But with my natural gift for killing plants, how was I to succeed and what was I to grow? If it doesn't meow at me, I forget to feed it. I knew that I had to be prepared. 

I used wooden pallets to build the vegetable patch frame. I bought earth, gardening tools and seeds. I took compost from my local recycling centre. I started my own compost. I even took time out of my relaxing holiday to study the shadows as they moved across the garden to decide where to best place my vegetables..

Now, I know what you're thinking. With so much preparation, what could possibly go wrong?? After 4 days of watering every morning and evening, victory! My little seedlings had emerged. 

Unfortunately, the one thing that I hadn't taken into consideration was... My 10 month old cat. In comparison to the poor, sandy soil elsewhere in our garden, such beautiful, rich soil was very exciting for her. For a week, I woke each morning to find holesuprooted plants and little brown bombs placed around my vegetable patch by my cat.

I put up a protective net, to create a cats- free-zone. It didn't work! The net was used first, as a hammock and then, pulled down. The corn salad was lost. The beetroot was destroyed, and my spirit was broken. 

But even in this chaos, the rocket salad and courgette made it through. A few coriander plants survived, and the chilli pepper plant gave fruit. The net is now stronger, the cat's evil plan to stop my green fingers is foiled, and I'm happy to report that rocket is on the menu every day.

Vocabulary

green fingers- la main verte 

Vegetable patch- potager 

Meow- miaou 

frame-cadre

Gardening tools- des utiles de jardinage

 

Seeds- des grains

Seedlings- les germes 

Poor, sandy soil- un sol pauvre et sablonneux 

Hole- trou

Uprooted plants- des plants déracinés 

Little brown 'bombs'- utilisé ici pour dire caca du chat

Net- filet

Corn salad- mâche 

Evil plan- plan méchant

To foil- dejouer

00:0000:00

70 - My First Vegetable Patch - Slow

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

My last trip back home to England was in May for my beautiful cousin's beautiful wedding. Springtime in 'Sunny Devon' is really something. The countryside is really green after a long winter of rain, and the flowers are gorgeous.

My family all have green fingers, with stunning gardens. And yet, I live on a paradise island and, looking at my garden, you can see that I missed out on this gene. I was both inspired and determined. My new project for these winter holidays? To start my very own vegetable patch!

But with my natural gift for killing plants, how was I to succeed and what was I to grow? If it doesn't meow at me, I forget to feed it. I knew that I had to be prepared. 

I used wooden pallets to build the vegetable patch frame. I bought earth, gardening tools and seeds. I took compost from my local recycling centre. I started my own compost. I even took time out of my relaxing holiday to study the shadows as they moved across the garden to decide where to best place my vegetables..

Now, I know what you're thinking. With so much preparation, what could possibly go wrong?? After 4 days of watering every morning and evening, victory! My little seedlings had emerged. 

Unfortunately, the one thing that I hadn't taken into consideration was... My 10 month old cat. In comparison to the poor, sandy soil elsewhere in our garden, such beautiful, rich soil was very exciting for her. For a week, I woke each morning to find holesuprooted plants and little brown bombs placed around my vegetable patch by my cat.

I put up a protective net, to create a cats- free-zone. It didn't work! The net was used first, as a hammock and then, pulled down. The corn salad was lost. The beetroot was destroyed, and my spirit was broken. 

But even in this chaos, the rocket salad and courgette made it through. A few coriander plants survived, and the chilli pepper plant gave fruit. The net is now stronger, the cat's evil plan to stop my green fingers is foiled, and I'm happy to report that rocket is on the menu every day.

Vocabulary

green fingers- la main verte 

Vegetable patch- potager 

Meow- miaou 

frame-cadre

Gardening tools- des utiles de jardinage

 

Seeds- des grains

Seedlings- les germes 

Poor, sandy soil- un sol pauvre et sablonneux 

Hole- trou

Uprooted plants- des plants déracinés 

Little brown 'bombs'- utilisé ici pour dire caca du chat

Net- filet

Corn salad- mâche 

Evil plan- plan méchant

To foil- dejouer

00:0000:00

70 - My First Vegetable Patch

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

My last trip back home to England was in May for my beautiful cousin's beautiful wedding. Springtime in 'Sunny Devon' is really something. The countryside is really green after a long winter of rain, and the flowers are gorgeous.

My family all have green fingers, with stunning gardens. And yet, I live on a paradise island and, looking at my garden, you can see that I missed out on this gene. I was both inspired and determined. My new project for these winter holidays? To start my very own vegetable patch!

But with my natural gift for killing plants, how was I to succeed and what was I to grow? If it doesn't meow at me, I forget to feed it. I knew that I had to be prepared. 

I used wooden pallets to build the vegetable patch frame. I bought earth, gardening tools and seeds. I took compost from my local recycling centre. I started my own compost. I even took time out of my relaxing holiday to study the shadows as they moved across the garden to decide where to best place my vegetables..

Now, I know what you're thinking. With so much preparation, what could possibly go wrong?? After 4 days of watering every morning and evening, victory! My little seedlings had emerged. 

Unfortunately, the one thing that I hadn't taken into consideration was... My 10 month old cat. In comparison to the poor, sandy soil elsewhere in our garden, such beautiful, rich soil was very exciting for her. For a week, I woke each morning to find holesuprooted plants and little brown bombs placed around my vegetable patch by my cat.

I put up a protective net, to create a cats- free-zone. It didn't work! The net was used first, as a hammock and then, pulled down. The corn salad was lost. The beetroot was destroyed, and my spirit was broken. 

But even in this chaos, the rocket salad and courgette made it through. A few coriander plants survived, and the chilli pepper plant gave fruit. The net is now stronger, the cat's evil plan to stop my green fingers is foiled, and I'm happy to report that rocket is on the menu every day.

Vocabulary

green fingers- la main verte 

Vegetable patch- potager 

Meow- miaou 

frame-cadre

Gardening tools- des utiles de jardinage

Seeds- des grains

Seedlings- les germes 

Poor, sandy soil- un sol pauvre et sablonneux 

Hole- trou

Uprooted plants- des plants déracinés 

Little brown 'bombs'- utilisé ici pour dire caca du chat

Net- filet

Corn salad- mâche 

Evil plan- plan méchant

To foil- dejouer

00:0000:00

69 - Culture Shock - Vocabulary

Visit www.anglais.re for more !

Back home we do things differently, everything from greeting each other to the food that we eat and all the little differences in between. These little differences that we don’t even notice when we are in our home countries play a big role in our lives when we travel to a new place.  In Canada things are a little different than they are here, which is why culture shock can have a big impact when traveling abroad, especially for the first time.  Culture shock can be defined as a personal disorientation which is felt when experiencing a different way of life. This comes from the contradiction between our accustomed way of life and the conflict in trying to maintain that in a new cultural environment.

Common symptoms of culture shock include: extreme homesickness, sleep disturbances, extreme concerns over sanitation and safety, stereotyping and excessive critical reactions. Since I have been living in Reunion for almost three years, I have begun to forget about all the differences that could make a visitor feel disoriented, however, my recent visit from my family has reminded me of some of them. 

For example, kissing everyone you meet instead of shaking hands takes some getting used to.  Also, language barriers can add to the feeling of being disorientated, and left out of general conversations.  In Canada even though we are used to seeing French written everywhere we are also used to always having the English translation to follow. When I first arrived in France it took me awhile before I stopped turning over every jar or label looking for the English side.  Another difference between the two countries is the culture of tipping.  In Canada it is customary, even expected that one leaves at least a 15% tip at the end of every meal.  Now, imagine the look of surprise when my mum left a six euro tip at a snack bar here.  One of the biggest differences though between Canada and Reunion is our definition of the word WINTER.  In Canada this means snow, slush, mittens, scarves, hats, and temperatures that drop below -25°C. So, when my mum arrived for winter in Reunion she was surprised to be wearing a t-shirt and see people laying on the beach.  However, as soon as the sun set and the temperature dropped to 17°C, my house seemed freezing to her. This is because in Canada all the houses have central heating, which means that the temperature inside rarely drops below 23°C and we can walk around in t-shirts indoors all year round.

These are just a few of the many noticeable differences, but what about the social differences?  These tend to be a little more subtle: facial expressions, gestures, social norms and customs which are all learned unconsciously.  I can still remember when I arrived in France four years ago, how uncomfortable even a basic conversation could be when I misinterpreted all the social cues that went along with it.  Basically, when moving to or even visiting a new country we must relearn many of our learned behaviours and the older we get the more difficult this may become.

How can we overcome culture shock? First of all it helps to remember that we are not born with culture, but we are born with the capacity to learn from our surroundings, and this continues throughout life.  Adapting to a new culture requires relearning what we might already feel comfortable with.  Learning the language of the country is a big help, this can be very difficult, but over time it is the best way to integrate oneself in a different culture.  Most important is to keep an open mind, understand and embrace the differences and this will help one adjust to all the changes they may encounter.  As Theodore Roosevelt once said “There can be no life without change, and to be afraid of what is different or unfamiliar is to be afraid of life.”

 

Vocabulary

culture shock - choc culturel

travel abroad - voyager à l’étranger

accustomed - habituel

maintain - maintenir

common - ordinaire

homesickness - mal du pays

disturbance - troubles

sanitation - hygiène publique

shake hands - serrer la main

tip - pourboire

customary - coutumier

slush - la neige fondue

mittens - moufles

freezing - glacial

central heating - chauffage central

noticeable - visible

misinterpret - mal comprendre         

overcome - surmonter

surroundings - alentours

open mind - esprit ouvert

embrace - adopter

encounter - rencontrer

00:0000:00

69 - Culture Shock - Slow

Visit www.anglais.re for more !

Back home we do things differently, everything from greeting each other to the food that we eat and all the little differences in between. These little differences that we don’t even notice when we are in our home countries play a big role in our lives when we travel to a new place.  In Canada things are a little different than they are here, which is why culture shock can have a big impact when traveling abroad, especially for the first time.  Culture shock can be defined as a personal disorientation which is felt when experiencing a different way of life. This comes from the contradiction between our accustomed way of life and the conflict in trying to maintain that in a new cultural environment.

Common symptoms of culture shock include: extreme homesickness, sleep disturbances, extreme concerns over sanitation and safety, stereotyping and excessive critical reactions. Since I have been living in Reunion for almost three years, I have begun to forget about all the differences that could make a visitor feel disoriented, however, my recent visit from my family has reminded me of some of them. 

For example, kissing everyone you meet instead of shaking hands takes some getting used to.  Also, language barriers can add to the feeling of being disorientated, and left out of general conversations.  In Canada even though we are used to seeing French written everywhere we are also used to always having the English translation to follow. When I first arrived in France it took me awhile before I stopped turning over every jar or label looking for the English side.  Another difference between the two countries is the culture of tipping.  In Canada it is customary, even expected that one leaves at least a 15% tip at the end of every meal.  Now, imagine the look of surprise when my mum left a six euro tip at a snack bar here.  One of the biggest differences though between Canada and Reunion is our definition of the word WINTER.  In Canada this means snow, slush, mittens, scarves, hats, and temperatures that drop below -25°C. So, when my mum arrived for winter in Reunion she was surprised to be wearing a t-shirt and see people laying on the beach.  However, as soon as the sun set and the temperature dropped to 17°C, my house seemed freezing to her. This is because in Canada all the houses have central heating, which means that the temperature inside rarely drops below 23°C and we can walk around in t-shirts indoors all year round.

These are just a few of the many noticeable differences, but what about the social differences?  These tend to be a little more subtle: facial expressions, gestures, social norms and customs which are all learned unconsciously.  I can still remember when I arrived in France four years ago, how uncomfortable even a basic conversation could be when I misinterpreted all the social cues that went along with it.  Basically, when moving to or even visiting a new country we must relearn many of our learned behaviours and the older we get the more difficult this may become.

How can we overcome culture shock? First of all it helps to remember that we are not born with culture, but we are born with the capacity to learn from our surroundings, and this continues throughout life.  Adapting to a new culture requires relearning what we might already feel comfortable with.  Learning the language of the country is a big help, this can be very difficult, but over time it is the best way to integrate oneself in a different culture.  Most important is to keep an open mind, understand and embrace the differences and this will help one adjust to all the changes they may encounter.  As Theodore Roosevelt once said “There can be no life without change, and to be afraid of what is different or unfamiliar is to be afraid of life.”

 

Vocabulary

culture shock - choc culturel

travel abroad - voyager à l’étranger

accustomed - habituel

maintain - maintenir

common - ordinaire

homesickness - mal du pays

disturbance - troubles

sanitation - hygiène publique

shake hands - serrer la main

tip - pourboire

customary - coutumier

slush - la neige fondue

mittens - moufles

freezing - glacial

central heating - chauffage central

noticeable - visible

misinterpret - mal comprendre         

overcome - surmonter

surroundings - alentours

open mind - esprit ouvert

embrace - adopter

encounter - rencontrer

00:0000:00

69 - Culture Shock

Visit www.anglais.re for more !

Back home we do things differently, everything from greeting each other to the food that we eat and all the little differences in between. These little differences that we don’t even notice when we are in our home countries play a big role in our lives when we travel to a new place.  In Canada things are a little different than they are here, which is why culture shock can have a big impact when traveling abroad, especially for the first time.  Culture shock can be defined as a personal disorientation which is felt when experiencing a different way of life. This comes from the contradiction between our accustomed way of life and the conflict in trying to maintain that in a new cultural environment.

Common symptoms of culture shock include: extreme homesickness, sleep disturbances, extreme concerns over sanitation and safety, stereotyping and excessive critical reactions. Since I have been living in Reunion for almost three years, I have begun to forget about all the differences that could make a visitor feel disoriented, however, my recent visit from my family has reminded me of some of them. 

For example, kissing everyone you meet instead of shaking hands takes some getting used to.  Also, language barriers can add to the feeling of being disorientated, and left out of general conversations.  In Canada even though we are used to seeing French written everywhere we are also used to always having the English translation to follow. When I first arrived in France it took me awhile before I stopped turning over every jar or label looking for the English side.  Another difference between the two countries is the culture of tipping.  In Canada it is customary, even expected that one leaves at least a 15% tip at the end of every meal.  Now, imagine the look of surprise when my mum left a six euro tip at a snack bar here.  One of the biggest differences though between Canada and Reunion is our definition of the word WINTER.  In Canada this means snow, slush, mittens, scarves, hats, and temperatures that drop below -25°C. So, when my mum arrived for winter in Reunion she was surprised to be wearing a t-shirt and see people laying on the beach.  However, as soon as the sun set and the temperature dropped to 17°C, my house seemed freezing to her. This is because in Canada all the houses have central heating, which means that the temperature inside rarely drops below 23°C and we can walk around in t-shirts indoors all year round.

These are just a few of the many noticeable differences, but what about the social differences?  These tend to be a little more subtle: facial expressions, gestures, social norms and customs which are all learned unconsciously.  I can still remember when I arrived in France four years ago, how uncomfortable even a basic conversation could be when I misinterpreted all the social cues that went along with it.  Basically, when moving to or even visiting a new country we must relearn many of our learned behaviours and the older we get the more difficult this may become.

How can we overcome culture shock? First of all it helps to remember that we are not born with culture, but we are born with the capacity to learn from our surroundings, and this continues throughout life.  Adapting to a new culture requires relearning what we might already feel comfortable with.  Learning the language of the country is a big help, this can be very difficult, but over time it is the best way to integrate oneself in a different culture.  Most important is to keep an open mind, understand and embrace the differences and this will help one adjust to all the changes they may encounter.  As Theodore Roosevelt once said “There can be no life without change, and to be afraid of what is different or unfamiliar is to be afraid of life.”

 

Vocabulary

culture shock - choc culturel

travel abroad - voyager à l’étranger

accustomed - habituel

maintain - maintenir

common - ordinaire

homesickness - mal du pays

disturbance - troubles

sanitation - hygiène publique

shake hands - serrer la main

tip - pourboire

customary - coutumier

slush - la neige fondue

mittens - moufles

freezing - glacial

central heating - chauffage central

noticeable - visible

misinterpret - mal comprendre         

overcome - surmonter

surroundings - alentours

open mind - esprit ouvert

embrace - adopter

encounter - rencontrer

00:0000:00

68 - Taxing to Say the Least - Vocabulary

Taxing, to say the least.

 

My story starts in February, when I received my council tax. Actually, I received one, and my wife received one. Strange. As you know, council tax is based on a household, not a person, so to receive two council taxes to the same address is bizarre to say the least. I contacted the treasury in St Louis, and they recommended sending an email. Which I did.

 

Two months pass, and I receive a letter reminding me to pay my council tax. Stranger still, as we had already paid our tax. Well, one of them, of course. Once again I contacted the treasury in St Louis, and once again, they recommended I send an email. Which was swiftly done.

 

Then, on my birthday on July 25, I receive a letter saying that my bank account will be frozen, and the money I "owed", which was €1,300, would be taken from my account. Oh, FFS!! So early Monday morning, the wife and I take a morning off work to head to the tax office in St Pierre, documents in hand. After a long wait we meet with a representative. She explains that we were completely in the right, and she advised us to not pay the second council tax. She also contacted another department of the tax office that deals with account freezing, and told them to not freeze my account. I even called this department later on in the day, and they promised that the account wouldn't be frozen.

 

That was on a Monday, on Wednesday my account was frozen, and my bank charged me €110 for the pleasure. Annoyed, I spoke to somebody at the bank who informed me that nothing can be done about it, as the bank manager was on holiday until August 18, and nobody had the power to refund the stolen money.

 

I also queued up at the tax office in St Louis, to talk to a simple little man, who had the nerve to ask me "Why didn't you try to resolve this problem before?" Completely ignoring the print-outs of the emails I had sent in February and April. In fact, his response to each complaint I had was either, "That's your fault" or "I don't know". He said we should send an email with all the information on, to the tax office. Yes, another email.

 

French red tape is probably the worst I've ever had the misfortune of dealing with. It certainly doesn't help that the staff that I emailed didn't have the decency to respond to my many emails. Nor that the left hand had no interest in talking to the right hand.

 

Leaving the tax office in St Louis, I saw a plethora of posters advising people to "Simplify your life, do your taxes online." My advise to you, is to do everything in person, and with paper. Every time you talk to someone on the phone or in an office, take their name. Never send emails to them, as they seem incapable of opening them. Simplify your life, do your taxes right in their faces!

 

Vocabulary

 

council tax - tax d'habitation

actually - en fait

household - foyer

swiftly - rapidement

frozen - bloqué (congelé)

 

FFS - zute alors

departement - service

annoyed - agacé

resolve - résoudre

red tape - paperasserie

00:0000:00

68 - Taxing To Say the Least - Slow

Taxing, to say the least.

 

My story starts in February, when I received my council tax. Actually, I received one, and my wife received one. Strange. As you know, council tax is based on a household, not a person, so to receive two council taxes to the same address is bizarre to say the least. I contacted the treasury in St Louis, and they recommended sending an email. Which I did.

 

Two months pass, and I receive a letter reminding me to pay my council tax. Stranger still, as we had already paid our tax. Well, one of them, of course. Once again I contacted the treasury in St Louis, and once again, they recommended I send an email. Which was swiftly done.

 

Then, on my birthday on July 25, I receive a letter saying that my bank account will be frozen, and the money I "owed", which was €1,300, would be taken from my account. Oh, FFS!! So early Monday morning, the wife and I take a morning off work to head to the tax office in St Pierre, documents in hand. After a long wait we meet with a representative. She explains that we were completely in the right, and she advised us to not pay the second council tax. She also contacted another department of the tax office that deals with account freezing, and told them to not freeze my account. I even called this department later on in the day, and they promised that the account wouldn't be frozen.

 

That was on a Monday, on Wednesday my account was frozen, and my bank charged me €110 for the pleasure. Annoyed, I spoke to somebody at the bank who informed me that nothing can be done about it, as the bank manager was on holiday until August 18, and nobody had the power to refund the stolen money.

 

I also queued up at the tax office in St Louis, to talk to a simple little man, who had the nerve to ask me "Why didn't you try to resolve this problem before?" Completely ignoring the print-outs of the emails I had sent in February and April. In fact, his response to each complaint I had was either, "That's your fault" or "I don't know". He said we should send an email with all the information on, to the tax office. Yes, another email.

 

French red tape is probably the worst I've ever had the misfortune of dealing with. It certainly doesn't help that the staff that I emailed didn't have the decency to respond to my many emails. Nor that the left hand had no interest in talking to the right hand.

 

Leaving the tax office in St Louis, I saw a plethora of posters advising people to "Simplify your life, do your taxes online." My advise to you, is to do everything in person, and with paper. Every time you talk to someone on the phone or in an office, take their name. Never send emails to them, as they seem incapable of opening them. Simplify your life, do your taxes right in their faces!

 

Vocabulary

 

council tax - tax d'habitation

actually - en fait

household - foyer

swiftly - rapidement

frozen - bloqué (congelé)

 

FFS - zute alors

departement - service

annoyed - agacé

resolve - résoudre

red tape - paperasserie

00:0000:00

68 - Taxing. To Say The Least

Taxing, to say the least.

My story starts in February, when I received my council tax. Actually, I received one, and my wife received one. Strange. As you know, council tax is based on a household, not a person, so to receive two council taxes to the same address is bizarre to say the least. I contacted the treasury in St Louis, and they recommended sending an email. Which I did.

Two months pass, and I receive a letter reminding me to pay my council tax. Stranger still, as we had already paid our tax. Well, one of them, of course. Once again I contacted the treasury in St Louis, and once again, they recommended I send an email. Which was swiftly done.

Then, on my birthday on July 25, I receive a letter saying that my bank account will be frozen, and the money I "owed", which was €1,300, would be taken from my account. Oh, FFS!! So early Monday morning, the wife and I take a morning off work to head to the tax office in St Pierre, documents in hand. After a long wait we meet with a representative. She explains that we were completely in the right, and she advised us to not pay the second council tax. She also contacted another department of the tax office that deals with account freezing, and told them to not freeze my account. I even called this department later on in the day, and they promised that the account wouldn't be frozen.

That was on a Monday, on Wednesday my account was frozen, and my bank charged me €110 for the pleasure. Annoyed, I spoke to somebody at the bank who informed me that nothing can be done about it, as the bank manager was on holiday until August 18, and nobody had the power to refund the stolen money.

I also queued up at the tax office in St Louis, to talk to a simple little man, who had the nerve to ask me "Why didn't you try to resolve this problem before?" Completely ignoring the print-outs of the emails I had sent in February and April. In fact, his response to each complaint I had was either, "That's your fault" or "I don't know". He said we should send an email with all the information on, to the tax office. Yes, another email.

French red tape is probably the worst I've ever had the misfortune of dealing with. It certainly doesn't help that the staff that I emailed didn't have the decency to respond to my many emails. Nor that the left hand had no interest in talking to the right hand.

Leaving the tax office in St Louis, I saw a plethora of posters advising people to "Simplify your life, do your taxes online." My advise to you, is to do everything in person, and with paper. Every time you talk to someone on the phone or in an office, take their name. Never send emails to them, as they seem incapable of opening them. Simplify your life, do your taxes right in their faces!

Vocabulary

council tax - tax d'habitation

actually - en fait

household - foyer

swiftly - rapidement

frozen - bloqué (congelé)

FFS - zute alors

departement - service

annoyed - agacé

resolve - résoudre

red tape - paperasserie

00:0000:00

67 - Music in Culture - Vocabulary

Visit www.anglais.re for more!

What gives a country its identity? What defines culture? Is it food? People? Fashion? Art? Tradition? Religion?…..I guess all of those to some extent, and many more. But one of the most important and central aspects to any culture has to be music.

Whether it’s Brazilian Samba, British Rock ’N’ Roll, or Jamaican Reggae, each country has its own sound. Of course there are the generic sounds which you can find anywhere, Pop music for example - listening to NRJ here is not so different to listening to any UK popular Radio station, it’s music for the masses. But dig a little deeper and normally you will find a sound which represents the people and their story. 

Here in Reunion, we have a very diverse population and as a result the culture has influences from all over the world. The music we most often associate with Reunion is Maloya and Sega. They have their roots in Africa, and the slaves who were so important in the island’s history created these 2 sounds with a mix of traditional African beats and added European influences and instruments. At a time when the slaves didn’t necessarily have a common language, they communicated with music. That is the beauty, it’s a language that everybody can communicate in, it breaks down barriers, brings people together with song and dance. 

The island continues to have a huge music culture. You can find almost any style here and the ‘Fete de la Musique’ on the 21st of June is one of the biggest events of the year in many towns, where free concerts are organised, and temporary stages are setup for concerts that often continue into the early hours. Music continues to bring people together, as it historically did. 

I have a pretty broad taste in music and have been to many different events on the island. I’ve heard styles as varied as ska, techno, & gospel and even experienced a ‘kabar’. The kabar was a fantastic event, around 1,000 people of all ages and backgrounds descended into Mafate, danced under the full moon in front of a makeshift stage to maloya, rock and electronic music for an entire weekend. It was a real festival atmosphere, friendly and welcoming. At the other end of the scale, we have bigger festivals and events such as Sakifo, Les Electropicales, KabarDock, Manapany and Tempo to name a few. Often they combine a mix of local talent and international acts to great effect. This allows the people on the island to enjoy world music, but also helps to retain and even promote the styles which were born and evolved here. 

So whether you want to try your hand at the kayamb, dance along to some Tango, or enjoy a sunset cocktail with an Ibiza style soundtrack, you can find it all here on our wonderful island.

Vocabulary

to some extent - dans une certaine mesure
dig - creuser / aller un peu plus loin
roots - racines
breaks down barriers - briser les barrières
huge - très grande

stages - scènes
broad taste - un gout varié
makeshift - improvisé
at the other end of the scale - dans l’autre coté
retain - retenir

soundtrack - un fond sonore

00:0000:00